sisabet
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/02/00 12:34 PM
Books that Become Movies

I have this weird thing about finding out that a book is being made into a movie and I have to then read that book. I don't necessarily have to see the movie (Wonder Boys by Michael Chabon comes to mind). Drivel like The Bridges of Madison County/Message In A Bottle does not count. I remember sitting in a movie theater a couple of years back and seeing an early trailer of Stir of Echoes. As soon as I spotted the flash - "based on the novel by Richard Matheson - I started a city-wide hunt for the book (which was hard since it was not being reissued until closer to the film's release date).
Does anyone else share my peculiar obsession/compulsion? Better still, any recommendations?


cynical
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/02/00 12:44 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I don't really find that I do that as a habit, but I absolutely did it in the case of Girl, Interrupted. I read the book as soon as I heard about the movie and then saw the movie after.

sisabet
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/02/00 12:53 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I have this other thing where I'm kind of turned off a book if I don't like who is in the movie. I know it is very irrational, but I am extremely opinionated about what actors I dislike and Winona Ryder is one of them. Now that the hype over the movie is dying down, I'd like to read the book - but not an edition with Ryder on the cover- Ugh. (Another strange thing about my habit - even though I'm reading the book because it is a movie, it is a point of honor with me to not read the "movie edition" of the book. - I know, and I promise to seek help as soon as I get a job with benefits)

sunflow
(Ching Shih)
11/02/00 01:54 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I only do that if it's a book that has already piqued my interest. I have to run out and buy it as soon as I can, before the "movie version" is the only one in stores. I still haven't read The English Patient, because I can only find ones with Ralph Fiennes on the cover. Now, I love me some Ralph Fiennes, but not on the cover of my books. It just seems a discourtesy to the author to imply that people will only want to read the book if it's been turned into Hollywood tripe or approved by a celebrity.

Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
11/02/00 10:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Oh, um, I do this too. Not to the extent where I'll run out to get a book just because a movie was made of it, but if I see a movie and I liked it, I'll try to find the book and flip through it, like The Godfather or The Talented Mr. Ripley, neither of which I actually read, the first because it is *the* definitive potboiler and the latter because it was too dif't from the movie and I didn't like the style (repressed). I will also pick up a book at random if a movie was made of it, like Smilla's Sense of Snow (which was okay and I didn't finish).

Three books I read that I picked up because they had been adapted to the screen, and which I liked:

Silence of the Lambs is better than the movie, and the movie is awfully good. I liked this book so much that it overrode the movie in my mind. (highest accomplishment)

High Fidelity is a book that I read before I saw the movie, and it ruined the flick a little. Liked both.

Strip Tease by Carl Hiaasen, by which I discovered Hiaasen, and I only flipped through it not because I'd seen the movie, oh God no, but because a movie had been made of it. I love Hiaasen -- he's zany.


sisabet
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/03/00 01:14 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I agree that Striptease was a great read and I am very fortunate that I have not seen the movie. Actually, I think the part I like the best is reading the book and then seeing the film - the book is never improved upon but I find it interesting to see how the filmmakers vision of the book plays out: if they are true to the storyline, preserve the characters, how does it deviate and why? Was it for exposition purposes or Hollywood convention? Sometimes I never get around to seeing the movie, but it's nice to know it is there.
Right now I'm reading "The Sweet Hereafter" by Russell Banks, unfortunately I saw the movie a couple of years ago. So far I'm enjoying the book more.
My sister wants to know if everyone's favorite comfort read, "A Wrinkle In Time" has ever been made into a movie? Anyone know?


cynical
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/03/00 01:38 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I thought the film adaptation of High Fidelity absoutely killed the charm of the book. I was so very disappointed as that was a top ten favorite book of mine.
I thought Accidental Tourist on the other hadn was one of the best adaptations I have ever seen.
I guess I am pretty militant about reading a book first if I can come to think of it. If I have not already done so unwittingly, you know, I mean read it on my own with no screenplay in sight.


FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
11/03/00 02:35 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just found out yesterday that one of my favorite books is being made into a movie starring Brad Pitt, with Julia Roberts in negotiation to play opposite him. It's a book I'd classify as science fiction, and there are three major women in the book so I can just imagine they are going to combine these women into one or get rid of one, make one really minor, and make the other Julia Roberts. I am NOT happy! I am very afraid to go see it, since the story is so complex and I know they're going to ruin it. I just know it!

Replay by Ken Grimwood. Story of a man who dies of a heart attack at (I think) 48 and comes back as 18, and keeps dying at the same time and coming back later every time. So he gets many chances to relive his life and fix the things he did wrong before.


Orlando
(Ching Shih)
11/03/00 09:19 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I guess I do this to a certain extent - if it's a movie that I think I want to see. I hate seeing a movie before I've read the book - I just find that it colours my reading of the book too much. Sometimes, even just knowing they've made the movie does this too especially if, like sisabet, I don't like who is in the movie.
Once I've read the book I can then feel free to like or dislike the movie without it ruining my "vision" of how it should be.
I've just read The Virgin Suicides and High Fidelity and I'm waiting to see the films - High Fidelity particularly because I really liked the book and I'm intrigued to see how they manage to transfer it to a movie. To me, it seemed an inherently English book and I'm wondering how it will work in an American setting.
I don't know if they've made A Wrinkle in Time into a movie, sisabet, but that's one book that I hope they never do - I just can't see it working at all!

- edited because I got those damned italics wrong again!



[This message has been edited by Orlando (edited November 03, 2000).]


sisabet
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/03/00 10:30 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

-I can't get these italics at all so don't feel bad.

I don't think a film will necessarily ruin a book if it is done well. Another plus is that a classic story has the chance of reaching a wider audience. I was 10 when I saw The Secret of NIMH and loved it. I was thrilled to find the book "Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH" and was shocked by how different and more complex it was than the movie (maybe that is when my obsession began). I never would have read the book if I had not enjoyed the movie and that would have been a shame. None of my nephew's friends have ever heard of Madeline L'Engle, much less A Wrinkle In Time. Sometimes you must go to great lengths to get the word out.

Great Movie Adaptations:
To Kill A Mockingbird
Silence of the Lambs
James and the Giant Peach
High Fidelity (I loved the movie)
Pride and Prejudice (BBC version - love those BBC versions)
The Cider House Rules (even though the movie was so dif from book I thought it preserved the spirit)

I am suffering from a block of any more - help me out here

almost forgot
Worst Adaptation of All Time:
Demi Moore's The Scarlett Letter


Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
11/04/00 06:36 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

My gut feeling about this subject is that I wish no movies were made from books, and especially of good books that I have read. It just feels wrong to force a performance from something not intended as such. Does that make sense? There have been some good adaptations though. Let's see. Um.

Well, The English Patient perhaps.
The problem I had with The English Patient is that after I read the book, and saw the film, I then read In The Skin Of A Lion, which introduces us to Caravaggio, and all I could see in my mind was Willem Dafoe as Caravaggio. Well, that's not too terrible I suppose.

I'm torn. Who really wants to see Jim Carrey as The Grinch though? It's sacrilege.


sisabet
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/04/00 06:50 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Kivrin, maybe it's because I am a story addict. There is something so personal about a book - and if a film is done well it can have that feeling for me. This is how the director saw it, felt about it, and this is how he/she is expressing it. I also love those director commentaries on DVD and behind the scenes footage, so maybe getting my hands on the book the film is based upon is just more of the same, only rawer. Sometimes I don't see how an adaptation can be done, usually I am disappointed but sometimes...

Oh, yeah I fell asleep during The English Patient when it came out a few years ago so I never bothered with reading the book - which is terrible to judge a book based on the movie and I promise to do penance as soon as I finish "White Teeth" which has to be back at the library Monday.

I enjoyed The Shawshank Redemption more than the Stephen King short novella it was based upon


[This message has been edited by sisabet (edited November 04, 2000).]


Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
11/04/00 07:38 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I think that making a movie out of a book is all right as long as you try not to judge one on the other, which is so very hard when a book you love is going to be filmed. Like The House of Mirth, a novel I love and that has just been filmed. I'm not going to see the movie, unless it is just short of amazing as I don't like to whimper in pain while watching a movie. Great books usually don't translate to great movies. Strangely enough, there are some horrid books that have made great movies. Godfather, for one. Psycho.

One great movie based on great source material: The Innocents, based on a novella by Henry James. Wonderful film.

Books that I loved that were translated onto the screen, with indifferent to good results (I just thought of them):

Tales of the City, better book but pretty grooving miniseries.

Searching for Bobby Fischer the movie was sweet and mostly watchable, but the book is a fascinating intro into the world of competitive chess and a father-son story, a personal, real-life account of a father whose son turns out to be a chess prodigy. Realistic, and it asks interesting questions about the duty of a parent and the nature of genius.

Little Big Man: an uneven film, even despite my Dustin Hoffman complex, based on a crackling, funny revisionist Western -- and this from a person who loathes Westerns and vowed never to read one. Thomas Berger's best book. The sequel is pretty good too, funnier and more romantic. (Though in the first book the hero is married to four women, three of them at the same time, he finds his soulmate in the second.)

Homicide: A Year on the Streets, by David Simon is a great non-fiction look of the homicide unit in Baltimore, and it is somewhat scary, because it looks as policework in wide angle view: bureaucracy, personality, integrity, comradery, race-relations, drugs, the legal system. Quite bizarre if you consider what a homicide detective's role is: to work within a highly structured system trying to decipher the reason behind a violent death. The TV show was my favorite before it ended.

As for me, I like picking up books that have been made into movies because I love movies, and the way they're made. I read some film crit, and it's just interesting to me the type of books that attract moviemaker's eyes. Not famous books, which are always used for the 'known' factor (classics into movies), but just everyday books, that are charming and usually have good character development. It's because of my love of movies and just plain curiosity.

[This message has been edited by Lady Agnew (edited November 04, 2000).]


Orlando
(Ching Shih)
11/04/00 07:46 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I think I tend to like movies adapted from books more if it's a book I didn't particularly enjoy. An example of this is the recent movie of Mansfield Park, my least favourite Jane Austen book. The whole slavery question was introduced and Fanny(who is definitely Austen's most boring, priggish heroine) became a sort of composite of the young Jane Austen and Elizabeth Bennett. Despite this, I liked the movie - whereas if they had taken such liberties with Pride and Prejudice or Emma I would be absolutely livid.
Sometimes when movie images fit my vision of the book, it's wonderful - like the glass church floating down the river in Oscar and Lucinda. Unfortunately, this happens very rarely.
All of this doesn't stop me going to movies made from books, but as I said in my previous post, I have to have read the book first.
Some film versions that I have liked(but never more than the book) are:
Oscar and Lucinda
The Wings of a Dove
The Age of Innocence
The English Patient



[This message has been edited by Orlando (edited November 04, 2000).]


Kethrai
(Ching Shih)
11/05/00 10:24 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I was truly happy that they made "Interview With A Vampire" into a movie, because then it was only a 2-hour movie that seemed like four instead of a four-hour book that went on FOREVER.

But I like reading the books of movies....if they seem good....but I'm still irritated with what they did with the Tom Clancy novels. First book and first movie good. After that...eh.


deeds
(Ching Shih)
11/14/00 02:38 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I have mixed emotions about book being made into movies. On one hand, I never would have read some of my favorite books- The Princess Bride by S. Morgenstern for one. I have read that book 2-3 times and laugh every time. The movie was a great satire, even if it didn't follow the book exactly, the essence waas there. Other movies/books where the book was different but the movie was good are Forrest Gump by Winston Groom, The Rocket Boys by Homer Hickum, Jr. (movie-October Sky)and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey.

On the flip side, some movies have been terrible (my opinion)such as Snow Falling on Ceders by David Guterson. Good book, terrible movie.

I too will find the book if I notice a movie is based on a book.


deeds
(Ching Shih)
11/15/00 11:07 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

An addendum to my previous post. The Princess Bride was abrigded by William Goldman, so if you look for it at the library it is listed under Goldman. Another thought brought to my attention, is there really an S. Morganstern or is this a tale within a tale??????

Bear
(Ching Shih)
11/15/00 12:41 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm pretty sure there is no S. Morgenstern - well, I assumed that from the book. Come on, did you really think William Goldman would write about his family like that if that were true?

I tend to dislike filmic adaptations of books I love - they never match my own imaginings, and then when I read the book again, I find myself thinking of the characters as the actors who played them. It's all very annoyings.

But here are some adaptations I thought treated their source material well...
A Room with a View
The Virgin Suicides
High Fidelity (which, despite misgivings about the location change, I preferred to the book -less 'oh, saintly, sensible women, they don't understand our foolish love of music...' nonsense)
The BBC Pride and Prejudice
The Ice Storm
A Handful of Dust


cordelia
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/15/00 02:27 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

First off, huuuuuge word on Demi Moore's "The Scarlet Letter" being the worst adaptation ever. I knew it was going to be bad when in the opening credits it said "loosely based" on the novel. That thing was "Last of the Mohicans," "The Crucible," and "The Scarlet Letter" all rolled into one!

When I was in high school, I wanted to believe that S. Morgenstern was real, but I don't think it was. Did anyone ever read the sequel?

I am very very afraid of the Matt Damon/Penelope Cruz/Billy Bob Thornton version of "All the Pretty Horses" which is supposedly being released soon. They're going to completely destroy the book. And then we'll have to put up with Matt Damon on its cover.


cat
(Ching Shih)
11/18/00 12:48 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Bear, you're right on about A Room With a View. I liked the book fine, but it was an acquired taste--had to read it a few times and develop an appreciation of it, whereas the movie was instantaneous, passionate love. Of course, I saw it at a vulnerable age--I was fourteen, desperately wishing for a George (or a Freddy), and it played at the only art-house movie theater in my dusty little town, so obviously I was overcome with the beauty of it all (er, and the naked, splashing men, the vicar excepted). I don't know--I like Forster, but he's so mannered that his stuff can feel a bit uptight. (And when you look uptight next to Merchant-Ivory films, well...)

Perhaps when my husband is away in a couple of weeks, I'll re-rent the movie--he nurses a passionate hatred of Helena Bonham-Carter. Anyone up for a slumber party?


Faria
(Ching Shih)
11/19/00 02:39 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm a teaching assistant at my college for a freshman writing class entitled "Coming of Age in America," and in order to get credit for the course, I am writing a paper comparing Huck Finn and Stephen King's long short story "The Body". Well, this weekend I rented the movie Stand by Me, which is based on King's short story. I have to admit that I loved it! I thought it really brought to life the spirit of the book, and the pain of growing up was so real.

Just finished the book version of High Fidelity...loved it! Can't wait to see the movie.


Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
11/21/00 05:18 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I don't look on book to movie translations as a reader, but as a person looking at movies for their own sakes. It's fascinating how many movies are based on books. Famous movies, so-so books.

Like Forrest Gump, The Graduate, The Godfather, The Wizard of Oz, The Grifters, Cabaret, Gone with the Wind, Shoot the Piano Player, Birth of a Nation, Last Picture Show, Dr. Strangelove; or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Bomb, etc. Some of the most famous movies ever were based on books. Some brilliant, great films were made out of books that are blah. Has anyone ever read Puzo's The Godfather? And, conversely, great books rarely become great movies.


sisabet
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/26/00 10:45 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Lady Agnew - when I was 12 I found a copy of The Godfather at my grandmother's house and loved it - but that opinion could be partly based upon the the thrill of reading a "forbidden" book. My uncle found it later and moved it out of reach (Very strict upbringing).

Caphricacorn
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
12/02/00 03:19 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I was at the b&n a few weeks ago and picked
up "Fight Club". It's now on my Christmas list


SweetSue61
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
12/05/00 04:07 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

After having seen the movie I cannot read the book. I feel as if the book has been tainted, or rather how I would imagine the characters to look and things like that.
Remember Interview with a Vampire? The stink that caused because the readers were just horrified to hear that Tom Cruise would play Lestat. I can think of no movie where the characters were so true to the book. I think Tom Cruise was the only one to play Lestat.
I'm told The Green Mile is also true to the book. But having seen the movie first I don't know if that is true.


Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
12/06/00 07:25 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Reading the book afterwards is one of my favorite things: I find interesting books that way, and if it's really good or engrossing, the book will supercede the drama onscreen. For instance, I saw Silence of the Lambs before reading the book, but I liked the book much better and I see, in my mind's eye, the material in the book when I think back to the book/movie.

Movies can't really do that to a favorite, much-loved book. Even the greatest of them can't really feel as intimate as the printed word: just how I'm built.


hula
(Ching Shih)
12/08/00 12:11 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I read Bastard out of Carolina this summer and wondered whether the movie would be any where near as good. Anyone read/seen them both?

I'd like to watch the movie, but not if I'm going to have some godawful Simon Birch experience.


listersgirl
(Ching Shih)
12/10/00 08:56 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I definitely with those people who read the book rather than see the movie. If I see the movie first, then read the book, my imagination is totally stunted, and it's too distracting finding the parts that the filmmakers left out.

Of course I can never manage to resist a movie adaption of a favorite book, even though I know the movie will never compare to the book. Yup, that was me running out to see High Fidelity as soon as it was released (luckily that time I wasn't too distraut, although they felt like two different stories).

Mostly, though, I think movie people should stick to making movies from short stories. How can you possibly fit a full length novel into a 2 hour film and expect to be remotely faithful to the book? I mean, the English Patient practically left out all my favorite storylines.


sunflow
(Ching Shih)
12/11/00 12:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

There are definitely instances in which the movie is better than the book. Robert Altman's The Player comes instantly to mind - the book was a fun and easy read, but just a step above pulp. The movie was incredible. All the intrigue and humor of the book was heightened, and Altman added layer upon layer of self-referential themes that could have only been created in film. The story was just better suited to that medium.

harper
(Ching Shih)
01/01/01 10:53 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

this is my first post (i just found the site today -- happy new year to me!!), and i have to share how thrilled i am to have found this place!!

now on topic, for those of you that like silence of the lambs, i highly recommend the first hannibal lecter book, red dragon, and the movie made from it, manhunter. both are excellent.

the virgin suicides is one of my favorite books ever, and i was very worried when i heard a movie was being made of it (and being directed by sofia coppola), but i was pleasantly surprised by the film. i thought it was a good adaptation

on a final note, i'm also one of those people who hate having a "movie version" of a book. i searched in vain for a non-matt damon version of the talented mr. ripley but had no luck.

[This message has been edited by harper (edited January 01, 2001).]


Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
01/01/01 02:13 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Welcome, harper. You may have to buy a series book to get a different cover for The Talented Mr. Ripley. Like this .

harper
(Ching Shih)
01/02/01 01:16 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

thanks kivrin! now that i know i like highsmith and plan to read more of the ripley books, i'll probably have to pick up that collection.

and the list of books to read grows ever longer...


cynical
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
01/02/01 01:28 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Word harper on Red Dragon. That book still gives me chills.
And Bear, I felt exactly the opposite about High Fidelity[/y]. I found the movie so unbearable that I had to turn it off because I just could not stand my boyfriend's, I mean John Cusak's, performance anymore. Sad but true. I thought all the humor was lost on the adaptation.
I thought [i]Accidental Tourist
was pretty on the money as far as adaptations go.


pinkvodka
(Ching Shih)
01/02/01 02:38 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Deborah, and anyone else who enjoyed Cold Comfort Farm RUN do not walk to the nearest video establishment and get the movie. I've almost reached the point where I can watch it without doing myself physical damage from laughing so hard, but if I'm watching it with someone who's never seen it before then I end up sharing their delight (and sore ribs).

Aneesa
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
01/02/01 06:08 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

this is a very uncomfortable topic to read/write about for me, probably because there's no solution. if you read the book first, you ruin the movie. if you see the movie first, you ruin the book. i suppose it's better to ruin the movie though.

i get the urge to read the books of movies that i really like (like emma), but i rarely get around to it. i think i'd sound cooler if i gushed over the book rather than the movie. and i hate it when people say things like "did you see [name of movie]?" when they're going to talk about something that applies to both the movie and the book and there's no reason not to refer to the original.

the worst is when books that can't be made into movies are made into movies. i think this is the case with girl, interrupted. the book is made up of lots of very short (under five-page) chapters, describing unrelated scenes--vignettes if you will. also, many of them rely on the fact that they're first-person monologues, because they're more like personal essays than stories and that feeling (of her trying to prove something) did not come off in the movie.

also, granted that i can't remember the book nearly as well as the cartoon and despite the ugly commercialization (affiliation with sprite, etc.), i really liked the new grinch. the only strange part is when you see flashbacks of the grinch as a child. the feeling of the movie seemed very true to the warmth and weirdness of dr. suess, and it was really funny (and made me cry).


licorice
(Ching Shih)
01/02/01 06:49 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Word (hmmm...just trying it out...what an interesting exclamation...I never get around to using it without embarrassing myself, and I figure this will be no different, so I am explaining the word choice - pun intended- ahead of time) on the Emma book/movie thing. I loathe Jane Austen - I thought I would die half way through Mansfield Park, perhaps by my own hand - and yet I couldn't resist reading Emma after seeing the movie. I've never admitted that before. How embarrassing. If you would do me a favor and keep that from the general public it would be most appreciated.

Anyhow, I never saw the Scarlet Letter with Demi Moore, she bugs me to no end, but in English class we viewed an earlier version of the film (because teachers sure as hell aren't paid to teach ), with which we kept our books open, and followed the majority of the movie word-for-word in our texts. I suppose that’s better than completely butchering a book, but if you are going to make a movie I would like to see at least a little creativity. Oh well.


Angiv
(Ching Shih)
01/14/01 09:16 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I tend to try to separate the two in my mind. This is often hard, but I love movies almost as much as I love books, so I don't like to deprive myself of either. Apart from anything else, I love to pick holes in filmed versions.

I do find though, that I'm more likely to forgive a book for being different from a film than vice versa. I saw A Room with a View long before I read the book, and love both, although I now frown at Julian Sands' blondness.

I recently read Sleeping with the Enemy and was amazed at how much of its deeper imagery and message was lost in the film version.

The 39 Steps is infinitely better on film. Meaning Hitchcock's version, not the other grossly inferior ones. The film bears no resemblance to the book other than its title and Hannay's name. This, as anyone who has read Buchan will know, is no bad thing.


deb
(Ching Shih)
02/17/01 09:43 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I have problems with movies being made out of books too. I don't know exactly how to explain it, but when I read a book that I feel is well-written, it is as if I know the characters-I can hear their voices, visualize how they are supposed to look and smell. Movies made out of books are almost always a disappointment for me. I loved Little Women (it was the first book I ever read) and hated the movie adaptation. It destroyed what Alcott wrote. The best movie adaptation that I've seen so far-and which has already been mentioned several times here-was the BBC's Pride and Prejudice. On the other hand, the one time I've ever seen the movie version of a book before actually reading the book was with The Cider House Rules and while I found the movie tolerable, I thought the book was practically incoherent.

edited to add that I've spent the last few hours reading old posts and you all know so much more then I do about books it's embarrassing. But it's going to be educational!

[This message has been edited by deb (edited February 17, 2001).]


Bear
(Ching Shih)
02/18/01 06:19 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

God, the BBC just showed an adaptation of Nancy Mitford's Love in a Cold Climate (actually, the TV version was an amalgamation of that novel and Mitford's previous book about the same characters, The Pursuit of Love) and my GOD it was dreadful. They've been two of my favourite books for years (they're very, very funny) and it was physically painful to watch them being butchered on screen. The humour and charm had vanished, and instead it was a prissy costume drama about irritating aristocrats living it up between the wars.

I mean, essentially that is what the books are about, but their considerable charm lies in the gorgeous, bitchy writing, and the appeallingness of the characters, and all that was gone. The actors playing the lead parts were just ridiculously wrong -and this is vile of me, I know, but when there is a character who's meant to be noticably beautiful and charming, why cast a shrill, hatchet-faced women who looks about twenty years older than the character is meant to be? And when there's a character who's meant to be sensible and ordinary looking, why cast a sort of waifish dreamy girl with a ridiculously airy-fairy voice which, her being the narrator, spoils the whole thing? Bah!


Angiv
(Ching Shih)
02/18/01 06:21 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Bear - I saw the adaptation as well, and enjoyed it, but I've never read the books. The adaptation made me want to read the books and I've read enough of your posts here to trust your taste in books, so now I want even more to read them.

I have a feeling that this will be like Dalziel & Pascoe where I loved them on TV until I read the books, and now I can't even stand to watch them.


Bear
(Ching Shih)
02/20/01 10:22 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Glad you trust my literary tastes, Angiv - I hope you're not disappointed by Nancy! And they're available in such lovely editions too (I got all mine in the late '80s, and they're not half as nice as the current Penguin editions). Read The Pursuit of Love first - Love in A Cold Climate is sort of a sequel. Be warned, they are terribly, outrageously snobbish, but so, so funny. The younger Radlett sisters are some of my favourite fictional characters ever. (Weirdly enough, the kids in Barbara Trapido's 1998 novel The Travelling Hornblower, are very, very like the wee Radletts - in a good way, though. She was definitely inspired by Mitford.)

Orlando
(Ching Shih)
02/20/01 11:09 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Definitely read the books - they're fantastic and so much better than the TV version. If you like Nancy's books I'd also recommend Hons and Rebels which is Jessica Mitford's autobiography. They were such a bizarre family, with their father being just like Uncle Matthes, child hunts and all.

Despite being such a snob Nancy saw herself as a socialist and the rest of them all had very strange politics - Unity was in love with Hitler, Diana married Oswald Mosley and Jessica helped found the Communist Party of America. One of my favourite scenes in Hons and Rebels is when they show their political loyalties by etching swastikas and hammer and sickles into the sitting room window with their diamond rings!

- edited because I just realised I got the italics wrong!

[This message has been edited by Orlando (edited February 24, 2001).]

[This message has been edited by Orlando (edited February 24, 2001).]


Bear
(Ching Shih)
02/20/01 03:36 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Oh, Hons and Rebels is the greatest! I love Jessica Mitford. Actually, I found a book of her collected journalism in a second hand bookshop just last week, and I was very happy. The Mitfords really are a fascinating family. The biography of Diana Mosley by Jan Dalley which came out last year is pretty good too, as are Nancy's essays A Talent to Annoy, which I think may be out of print. And I think Nancy's essential leftiness does come out, but she's still snobby in a very ingrained 'U' way - despising people who said 'notepaper' and 'mirror' and so on. Of course, she freely admitted it, so one can't really mind too much.

Okay, that was all very off topic.


Listen
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
02/25/01 12:51 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

When I was a kid I saw the excellent animated movie _The Last Unicorn_. Later, I read the book. Now, it may in part be because I read the book second, but I thought the movie was the closest I've ever seen a movie come to a book. The biggest difference I could see was that in the book Schmendrick the magician has a beard, and in the movie he doesn't. It's a beautiful, beautiful book, and if the movie doesn't capture its luminousness, it does follow the story and give a sense of the wonder that pervades the book.

[This message has been edited by Listen (edited February 25, 2001).]


opheliac
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
02/25/01 02:42 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I think the very best movie adaptation I've seen is the BBC version of Pride and Prejudice. I think it was just perfectly cast and the script used so much of the original dialogue that it was as perfect as one can get. (considering that most movie adaptations are wretched.)
But the most disappointing thing I ever saw was the "Anne of Green Gables: The Continuing Story" It was just absolutely ridiculous! The first two movies were slightly off, but still bearable...but this! It made absolutely no sense! There was not a single thing that fit with the novels, and I was so depressed and let down when I saw it!
I've heard that that a tv mini-series of Outlander is in the works. Anybody know anything about that?


melusina
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
03/05/01 10:33 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I would much prefer to read the book rather than/before seeing the movie. That said, I always meant to read Vanity Fair and didn't get around to it until after the BBC version aired. I loved both the BBC production and the novel.

My reaction to Possession being made into a movie is mixed. I love this novel, it's my favourite and while I know I won't be able to not see it, it seems it's fairly mangled. Roland Michell, an American?

When I was younger my mother wouldn't let me read Stephen King books or anything else in the horror genre. Once I was at a friend's slumber party and we watched Carrie at 2am (screamed and woke her parents up) and when I got home I told Mum in a "what-are-you-gonna-do-about-it?" kind of way and she just said "well I'd prefer you to see it rather than read it; your own imagination and interpretation is much more powerful to you than someone else's." That's stuck with me. Reading is so much more a personal experience.


SarahJanet
(Ching Shih)
03/12/01 04:06 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I am on the fence when it comes to movie adaptations. On one hand, when it works, it is so fabulous. The Princess Bride is the best example of that in my opinion, as both the book and movie are so wonderful.

However, I do get nervous about it when they try to turn my favourite books into movies. Someone mentioned The Secret of NIMH, which was an absolute travesty while Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH is one of my favourite books.

I also still hold a grudge against Disney for ruining 101 Dalmations. Few people have read the book by Dodie Smith, so that's one of those cases where the Disney version is thought of as the "right" version. Argh.

I'm also a little nervous about the upcoming Harry Potter film, but having seen the trailer for it, I am feeling a little better as it looks like it has the potential to be fantastic.


graceless
(Ching Shih)
04/09/02 08:11 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I guess this might be the best place to put this, but according to my new issue of Entertainment Weekly with Natalie Portman and Hayden Christenson on the cover, Nick Hornby's Fever Pitch is going to be made into another movie version. This time it will take place in Boston and will be about a baseball fan.
Colin Firth, can you do a Boston accent?

I could be wrong about where I found out, I got the magazine yesterday, and found out yesterday, just can't remember where.


bonster
(Ching Shih)
04/09/02 01:45 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I have mixed feelings about this too because it's so hit or miss - good book/bad movie, bad book/good movie, and every combination in between. If it's a book I really like, I'm generally afraid to see the movie as the odds of them getting it right are so slim (soooo glad I didn't see Simon Birch). I think one of the big reasons the BBC version of Pride & Prejudice is so wonderful is that they had 6 hours to tell the story rather than cramming it into 2.

On a related note, I just started reading The House of Mirth, and even though I haven't seen the movie, I can't get Gillian Anderson out of my head and it's really bugging me (but at least she's dressed in period costume and not like Scully...)!


Luthien
(Ching Shih)
04/10/02 07:04 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Books turned into movies are always a shaky issue with me. It can be done very well (Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, Sense and Sensibility are good examples, there are many others), or it can absolutely butcher a wonderful book (Disney's The Black Cauldron and the TV production of The Ballad of Lucy Whipple are the first to come to mind). Actually, as I have been thinking over this topic, I find that I can think of more good film adaptations of books than bad. I usually try to avoid any film that looks like it merely took the title of a book and then changed the entire content, so that might account for it.

In answer to some questions I have noticed floating around in this thread:

"The Princess Bride" is written entirely by William Goldman. S. Morgenstern is just a device to keep the story going and cut down on the necessary plot explication. The whole introduction about his wife and son and his father being from Florin is also ficticious (at least in part) because he does not have a son, just two daughters, and there never was a country called Florin (it's a currency, like its enemy country Guilder). I gathered this information from Goldman's book "Which Lie did I Tell: More Adventures in the Screen Trade", which is a very entertaining read. I wish I had had time to finish it (it was too expensive for me to buy, so I read it in bits at Chapters).

For all the "Wrinkle in Time" fans here, there is going to be a TV mini-series based on the book during May sweeps. I can't remember the network, but I suspect it's NBC as ABC is putting out that "Dinotopia" movie for sweeps. I can't wait, let's hope they don't utterly destroy L'engle's work. I read this in TV Guide's Fall Preview back in September.


chickeninthewoods
(Ching Shih)
04/10/02 07:45 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Call me shaky as well. I'll definitely avoid both book and movie if the movie is big on the hype (at least until my anti-hype nausea wears off). Example = Beloved. Still can't go near it.

But if a movie's based on a book that friends of mine have recommended, I'll probably head for the book and avoid the movie entirely. Example = The Handmaid's Tale.

If I see an independent film that I've really enjoyed, and discover it's based on a book, I sometimes hold off a bit for fear of tainting my joy in the film. Example = The Virgin Suicides. Now I'm in search of a used copy of the book, but it's nowhere to be found (I haven't looked that hard).

All that said, I think the most perfect adaptation from a book that I've ever seen is The Sweet Hereafter. It helps that the director writes (and wrote the screenplay), and that he and the author shared a common vision for the film, but it's a rare thing. By the way, there's a substantial amount of material from Egoyan and Banks on the DVD -- audio commentary and interviews with both.


shameless
(Ching Shih)
04/10/02 04:28 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Though I usually love a book much more than the movie adaption of it, I still enjoy watching movies of the old stories I love. For example, some books (short stories) turned movies I enjoyed are:
Jane Eyre (the one with Charlotte Gainsbourg); Girl Interrupted; The Bostonians (very subtle & Monica Potter is superb); The Shining; the BBC version of Wuthering Heights; House of Mirth; Dangerous Liaisons; Bernice Bobs her Hair (if you can find this at the library it's totally worth it); Like Water for Chocolate; The Joy Luck Club; the Masterpiece Theatre version of Moll Flanders; Rebecca: The Lover; Bridget Jones'; Fight Club (my favorite movie of all time); Henry and June; Member of the Wedding; Breakfast at Tiffany's; The Women; Carrie; The Age of innocence; etc.
I'm really looking forward to seeing Possession this June & Prozac Nation. Of course, there are excpetions. I would never see The Shipping News. The casting is all wrong and I can't deal with the tragedy of screwing up a perfectly solid story with shoddy character acting. But as for most anything else, if I liked the book and it has reputable actors (Sense & Sensibility) I'll pretty much watch it because I already love the characters.


amaline
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
04/12/02 03:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

God, if they mangle A Wrinkle in Time I'll just want to hurt someone. I had read a comment from Madeleine L'Engle a few months ago that she had never seen a script for that which she thought was good enough. So, let's hope this lives up to her standards.

JohnConstantine
(Ching Shih)
04/15/02 02:36 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by amaline:
God, if they mangle A Wrinkle in Time I'll just want to hurt someone. I had read a comment from Madeleine L'Engle a few months ago that she had never seen a script for that which she thought was good enough. So, let's hope this lives up to her standards.



word, word, a thousand times word. I'm very fond of that series.


graceless
(Ching Shih)
04/23/02 10:30 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

What are everyone's thoughts on the upcoming film version of Tuck Everlasting?
I think it will be great what with a cast that includes the amazingly talented Victor Garber (although he was in the HORROR that was Titanic), Gilmore Girl Alexis Bledel, Amy Irving, Sissy Spacek, Ben Kingsley and William Hurt.
I think they will do a fine job. I need to go find my copy of the book and reread it.


FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
04/23/02 02:29 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Victor Garber is the amazingly talented former Titanic actor you're talking about, right? I just love him, it hurt me to pieces when he turned out to be a jerk in Legally Blonde.

I don't want to hear it, I loved that movie. Yeah it was cheese, but it was cute cheese.


graceless
(Ching Shih)
04/23/02 05:27 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by FishDreamer:
Victor Garber is the amazingly talented former Titanic actor you're talking about, right? I just love him, it hurt me to pieces when he turned out to be a jerk in Legally Blonde.

I don't want to hear it, I loved that movie. Yeah it was cheese, but it was cute cheese.


Now which film are you calling cheese, I am a little confused?


deputman
(Ching Shih)
04/24/02 12:02 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

graceless, I think she meant Legally Blonde.

I'd also like to add that I'm thrilled that Jonathon Jackson will be playing Jesse Tuck. I was a huge General Hospital fan in high school, but also a theater student, and I was consistently impressed with his subtle work on the show, not an easy thing to achieve in the land of soap operas. To see his film work you'll have to check out the dreadful The Deep End of the Ocean, in which he does a good job with the material.


graceless
(Ching Shih)
04/24/02 09:44 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by deputman:
graceless, I think she meant Legally Blonde.

I'd also like to add that I'm thrilled that Jonathon Jackson will be playing Jesse Tuck. I was a huge General Hospital fan in high school, but also a theater student, and I was consistently impressed with his subtle work on the show, not an easy thing to achieve in the land of soap operas. To see his film work you'll have to check out the dreadful The Deep End of the Ocean, in which he does a good job with the material.


Although I highly enjoyed his work in Camp Nowhere .


deputman
(Ching Shih)
04/24/02 12:22 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Hee graceless, I figured that if I posted the Camp Nowhere credit after talking about his work on a soap, I'd lose a ll credibility.

graceless
(Ching Shih)
04/24/02 01:08 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by deputman:
Hee graceless, I figured that if I posted the Camp Nowhere credit after talking about his work on a soap, I'd lose a ll credibility.


I don't watch soaps. I tried in elementary school to watch one, and got quite bored with it.
So I wasn't losing any cred there, hopefully.


FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
04/24/02 02:52 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Um, yes Graceless, I was talking about Victor Garber in Legally Blonde. Sorry for the confusion. I wouldn't say that Titanic was cute cheese, because it wasn't. Sorry to be confusing.

BooBoo
(Ching Shih)
04/24/02 05:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

About Posession, I hear Aaron Eckhart is playing Roland and Gwyneth (like I need to put her last name) is playing Maud Bailey. Whether or not you guys think that they are good actors or not, it'll be interesting to see what Neil LaBute does with A.S. Byatt.

I'm really excited to see what happens in The Hours. Meryl Streep as a lesbian & Allison Janney as her partner, Julianne Moore as a repressed housewife and Nicole Kidman try to be Virginia Woolf. Fail or not, I will be in the theater.


deputman
(Ching Shih)
04/24/02 06:19 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

No credibility lost with me graceless I just figured people might role their eyes if I talked about the great actor from General Hospital and Camp Nowhere.

tenacitydrader
(Ching Shih)
04/24/02 08:19 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I thought both Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter did an excellent job. Lord of the Rings actually surpassed my image of Middle Earth. That doesn't happen very often in movies. I watched Harry Potter with some trepidition, but I was pleasantly surprised.

Gone With the Wind was a movie that I saw long before I ever read the book. I have to admit, though that that movie was so well casted/directed/set/costumed, etc, I did not have a problem plugging that into the book as I read it. Vivien Leigh WAS Scarlett. Clark Gable WAS Rhett. Everybody was just so perfect for thier roles. The only one I had a problem with was Ashley Wilkes, but then again I don't really like the character much.

Word to anyone who liked Interview with a Vampire, the movie better than the book. I don't like Anne Rice. I have read the book and I thought that Tom Cruise was the quintessential Lestat. Sorry folks.


chickeninthewoods
(Ching Shih)
04/24/02 08:46 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Gwyneth Paltrow is playing Maud? Right, sure, that makes sense... (no no no)

And all this time I was picturing a young Judy Davis (a la My Brilliant Career).


Laik
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
04/27/02 12:36 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Hmmm, I agree that Lord of the Rings was excellently done. To translate Tolkien so faithfully to the spirit of the books, if not exactly, was quite a feat. But then, I've got a soft spot for Peter Jackson as a filmmaker.

Ekaterina
(Ching Shih)
08/04/02 04:56 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm bumping this up because, Heaven Forbid, I just saw a commercial and learned that Disney - gack! Disney! - is making a movie of Madeline L'Engle's 'A Ring of Endless Light'. That was one of my favorite Austin books, and I've yet to see Disney not destroy a good book - like they did for 'The Jennie Project' which was very, very loosely based on 'Jennie' by Doulgas Preston. It seems from the ad that they took the basic element - Vicky communicating with dolphins - but took out Zachary Gray and the whole basic plot of her grandfather dying - and instead added a modern, politically correct plot - tuna fishermen are killing the dolphins. That seems more than a bit ridiculous to me; I hate how Disney, well, Disneyfies movies and somehow, I don't see how L'Engle wuld allow her book to be - destroyed! - in this way.

kju
(Ching Shih)
02/07/03 01:21 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The film version of Lord of the Rings has actually made me want to read the books - something that 10+ years of people telling me "Oh, it is fabulous, wonderful, you'll love it!" failed to do entirely.

I've nearly finished the first part.

I'd attempted to read 'The Hobbit' absolutely years ago and ditched it in disgust and boredom.


naomism
(Ching Shih)
02/07/03 05:31 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I have not yet read The Lord of the Rings, though I do remember reading The Hobbit as a child. I've seen the two LotR movies and I will probably wait until the third is out before taking up the books.

I have a theory that it's better to see the movie and then read the book because that way I'm never disappointed (the book is almost always better than the movie). I am somewhat trepidatious about reading LotR because I've already consumed so much fantasy and other speculative fiction and, although Tolkien was quite the trailblazer when the books came out, I'm worried that they won't impress me the way they seem to have impressed everyone else, especially those who read them as children/teenagers. I've had this happen to me before: when I started reading Dickens, I'd already read a bunch of authors who copied Dickens' style so that by the time I got around to him, it was old hat and I wasn't terribly impressed. Same with Hemmingway.

(edited because I apparently don't know how to use apostrophes)


KateP
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
02/16/03 09:04 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The movie version of Lord of the Rings (which I enjoyed) made me very grateful I hadn't read the books - they were about at my upper limit of pompousness as it was, and the thought of that sense of self-importance being carried over thousands of pages was more than I could bear!

The only films I know which really better the books are High Fidelity and About A Boy, both of which were books which I absolutely loathed but films I adored.

It's certainly much easier to enjoy movies of books you don't like since you don't have to battle with your own expectations. For many years I couldn't watch the BBC Pride and Prejudice because I couldn't stand Alison Steadman's performance as Mrs Bennett, which went against all of my lovingly conjured visions of her (though I'm glad I eventually persevered - Mr Collins was absolutely perfect, and hilarious!).


Impudent Dandelion
(Ching Shih)
02/19/03 01:07 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I am in the definite minority (I know of only one other person who shares my opinion) of Tolkien fans who loathed the first film, so much so that I absolutely refuse to see The Two Towers. I’ve given up trying to explain to fans of the films why I hate them so. To be fair, I do think the films are beautifully shot. But in every other sense I think that they are horribly, horribly wrong!

Sorry. As I said, I know that I am in the minority but I’ve read so much about how fabulous these films are that I felt it was time someone offered a dissenting opinion. I’ll go back to my corner now. Carry on.


studio1
(Ching Shih)
02/19/03 01:54 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Impudent, get out of that corner!

Don't feel bad about posting your thoughts here. You said how you felt, and your comment wasn't pointed or malicious, so rest easy about speaking your mind! \:\)

(My impression of the LOTR movies was "Meh", so you're certainly not alone.)

p.s. where in Canada are you from?


Impudent Dandelion
(Ching Shih)
02/20/03 01:55 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

...unfurls self from foetal position, crawls from corner and blinks at first glimpse of sunlight since posting anti-film message...

Thanks studio1! As someone who has all too often entered into debates with fans of the film, and a relative newbie to these forums, I have found hiding in my corner to be the best way to avoid the wrath that usually follows statements like the one I posted above. It’s nice to know that I’m not alone. The people on this site are swell.

I'm not entirely anti-films-from-books. In fact, in rare cases like The Commitments, I even prefer the film to the book (although those cases are certainly few and far between).

In response to your PS, I am from a small town in the Ottawa Valley that nobody has heard of, but I am currently stuck in Toronto and trying to claw my way back out.


Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
02/20/03 11:51 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Don't worry about being an ardent Tolkien fan who hated the first film--is that any worse than someone with a deep-seated indifference to the books loving the movie? I always (privately, mentally) snarked the books, and now I'm readng them just because of the movies. It's horrid, like I'm betraying my own sensitivities, being such a whore for my love of the movies. But enough of that.

As for most book/movie translations, I'm pretty easy-going. I mean, I've loved many movies based on novels that I've never read. (example: The Godfather, Wonder Boys, Dangerous Liaisons, Garden of the Finzi-Continis, Shoot the Piano Player, Charulata, Out of Sight) And there are even a few good films from Henry James--The Heiress, with Olivia de Havilland and Monty Clift, The Innocent with Deborah Kerr, and The Wings of the Dove, with Helena Bonham Carter. So it's not impossible to make great movies from books. Even if the interpretation isn't entirely faithful, a movie can still make something cool and new. It can shine in the ways a book can't. Especially with non-great books--with filmable action rather than non-cinematic introspection.

I do have to say that I hated the recent adaptation of Edith Wharton's House of Mirth. Not only because the movie has the visual flair and sedate pacing of a Masterpiece Theater outing. Not only because they made Selden less passive, which is just the whole point of his character. Selden never gets off the fucking fence--he can't. His passivity is the whole damning point of his personality. He isn't a hero, he can't save Lily because he can't even decide to save her. His interest wavers between the emotional and the intellectual. And it's the mirage of him loving her, of his vision of her as better than just a pretty, hollow-souled society lady that makes her destruction possible.

And Lily Bart. They ruined Lily. Gillian Anderson has the beauty, the age and the high sense of unsullied honor necessary for Lily. I can believe her in the period role. But she's too strong to play Lily, too steely to be brought down by those society jackals. Gillian Anderson is too solid, too tough to portray Lily.

end rant.


Kasa
(Ching Shih)
04/14/03 01:29 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Alright everyone... I just found this out tonight, and I thought you should be warned. I Capture the Castle. With Marc Blucas. I just really can't bring myself to say anymore. I'll let you all judge for yourselves.

The horror...


Klowey
(Ching Shih)
04/14/03 11:35 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Speaking of horror.

Has anyone else read The Serpent and the Rainbow by Wade Davis and then seen the Wes Craven movie?

The movie was middling to fair for what it was. But part of me was screaming at what they changed and sensationalised because the book conveyed the eeriness and the poetry of the situation so well without sending the main character into the grave.

Parts of me are very grateful that I did read the book beforehand, because if I had seen, "based on the book by Wade Davis" in the title credits without knowing what they changed I would have had a harder time getting into it. Just knowing who Davis is was enough to go, "No, that didn't happen. They probably changed that. That couldn't have been in the book. That might have been. 'Most powerful shaman in the Amazon?' Based on what comparision? A yearly convention?"


Lothlorien
(Ching Shih)
04/14/03 03:53 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

As you can probably tell from my nickname, I am an ardent Tolkien fan. I loved the book (I'm reading it for the 5th time now) and was therefore a bit apprehensive about how the movies would turn out. I was not familiar with Peter Jackson's work, but I have to say that I am now amazed.

I don't mind movie renditions of books as long as they stay true to the entire purpose of the book itself. Peter Jackson did exactly this (although there has been much debate about The Two Towers and I'll get to that later). The movies mostly impressed me with the grandeur of the locations, and the mere beauty of it all. The locations were not exactly as I had imagined them, but they totally blew me away. Peter seems to have a respect for Tolkien's work, which is why he stays true to much of the original story.

Critics of The Two Towers have commented that Peter had altered the storyline significantly by sending Frodo and Sam to Gondor. I don't mind this - after all, we cannot expect one to mimic the book exactly. I don't think Peter's alterations alter the purpose of The Two Towers at all, so all in all, I'm extremely satisfied. I cannot wait for The Return of th King.

The Harry Potter movies disappointed me. The Chamber of Secrets was far better than the first movie, but still did not capture the feeling of utter magic that the books induce. Perhaps the next one will be better.

Sorry for such a long post - it's my first, and I had a lot to say. \:\)


ice-queen
(Ching Shih)
04/14/03 10:39 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I seldom watch films of books I have read ... I have never seen a film adaptation of a Jane Austen novel for example ... I could not bear to see the changes they would have made ... however, I am very fond of To Kill a Mockingbird and think the film does it justice ...

I love my father and have thought of him every day since he died (in '76) but if I had to have another father I would want Atticus Finch ... and Gregory Peck playing the part was perfect for it.


nvilliers
(Ching Shih)
04/15/03 01:13 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Has anyone mentioned Adaptation with Nicholas Cage and Meryl Streep? I've finished the Orchid Thief, which is the basis for the movie. The movie is all about a writer who has a huge case of writer's block trying to make a screenplay out of the Orchid Thief. It's well-written, but I don't see how they could make a decent movie out of this -- which is probably why the movie took such zany and bizarre turns. It's hilarious. I definitely recommend the book and the movie, in that order.

beastiegirl
(Ching Shih)
04/15/03 01:21 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Peter had altered the storyline significantly by sending Frodo and Sam to Gondor.
Gack! Are you serious? Sigh. Will. not. start. rant. about. this.

I'm another who refused to see TTT because of what happened in the first film, and everything I've heard convinces me that I was right not to see it. I do, however, want to move to New Zealand yesterday.


JohnConstantine
(Ching Shih)
04/15/03 01:57 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

See, I'm perfectly content with the changes PJ made with TTT, with two small exceptions.

1. Gimli's story with Eomer, and their conflict over Galadriel got tossed too easily. I also wanted more on the "competition" between Legolas and Gimli at Helm's Deep, but I'm less aggravated about that.

2. Faramir being tempted by the ring. Made him a little too like Boromir, IMHO. And always thought Tolkien's original line, "I would not take it I found it at the side of the road." (I'm paraphrasing a little, as I don't have the book in front of me) was just brilliant. I was quite irked by that.

Otherwise, though, I'm pretty much fine with everything. It's an amazingly difficult book to adapt and PJ has managed to translate it effcetive to the screen into a film of remarkable power.


Lothlorien
(Ching Shih)
04/15/03 02:55 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by JohnConstantine:
Gimli's story with Eomer, and their conflict over Galadriel got tossed too easily.
I barely noticed that, probably because I was too engrossed in the rest of the movie. I don't really have a problem with it though, because even in the book, this story didn't really capture my attention.

About the Faramir being Boromir #2: I agree! That was my minor quibble with the film.

I can't wait to see how they top the Helm's Deep sequence.


Helina
(Ching Shih)
04/15/03 04:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

In theory I think that seeing the movie first and then reading the book works better for me because that way I'm free to enjoy the movie. Then when I read the book I'm usually delighted at the increased complexity and I find any differences interesting instead of annoying. That said, I sometimes resist seeing a movie before reading the book, especially with more literary books (like The Hours, The Age of Innocence, any of the Austen books). I always feel like I'd be cheating by seeing the movie first (because then the book would be easier to read? I don't know).

I also think that movies can be harmed by being too faithful to the book. The Harry Potter movies and Contact were actually ruined for me because of this. I'd read the books not long before seeing the movies and I found that I couldn't relax into the movie. Instead I found myself just marking plot points and waiting for the next event.


FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
04/15/03 10:39 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

nvilliers, Chicklit recently published an article written by Deirdre Swain, aka beastiegirl, on that very subject. It's here .

Edited to say I'm talking about Adaptation and The Orchid Thief. Must remember to reference what I'm referencing, no?


Exxie
(Ching Shih)
04/22/03 11:12 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

So I have a question regarding Breakfast at Tiffany's, the book vs. the movie. One thing I've heard in passing is that the book's narrator is gay, whereas the same character in the movie is not. I read the book and, honestly, I fail to see anything indicating his homosexuality. What am I missing there? I thought for a while that I'd just made up the gay thing, even though I was pretty sure there was a Seinfeld episode about it, but I read something just the other day talking about this which leads me to believe it's true. Is it a known thing or is there something in the book that talks about it? I feel like a moron who misread the entire thing, but if there were any gay references I really, really glossed over them. Anyone care to enlighten me?

Catness
(Ching Shih)
04/22/03 11:55 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Wha...? I just re-read the book this past fall and I didn't catch that reference at all. Can you cite a source for me, Exxie?

seabean
(Ching Shih)
04/22/03 01:14 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

It's been a while since I read the book, but I didn't remember this either. I found this page which mentions that the narrator of the novel was gay, but does not give any specifics.

Exxie
(Ching Shih)
04/22/03 01:22 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Catness - The first time I heard of it was that episode of Seinfeld. George was part of a bookclub, to impress a woman I think, and that was the book they were reading. Of course, George doesn't actually read the book and rents the movie instead (and there's this whole thing about him having trouble finding the movie). When he goes to discuss the book with the club he says something about Holly and the narrator (I can't remember his name right now) and everyone knows he didn't read the book because, apparently, the narrator is gay.

The second is a reference in The Feminine Mystique which, on page 270, says: "For like the call girl in Truman Capote's Breakfast at Tiffany's who spends the sexless night with the passive homosexual..."

But as far as I can remember there's nothing in the book to indicate that he's gay. I'm glad this surprised you as well because I've been worried that I completey misunderstood the entire book!


Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
04/23/03 01:43 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Faramir being tempted by the ring. Made him a little too like Boromir, IMHO. And always thought Tolkien's original line, "I would not take it I found it at the side of the road."
In interviews, Jackson has commented that he didn't want to make Faramir the second coming of Boromir, it's just that they've spent the entire five hours preceding trying to convince the audience that the ring is bad mojo, and practically irresistable, and then Faramir comes along and easily resists. Too easily resists. It's a burp in the narrative drive.

And just to share, the special extended version of TTT will be forty-four minutes longer, with more Gollum, more Merry and Pippin with the Ents.


TraceyB
(Ching Shih)
04/23/03 10:09 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
And just to share, the special extended version of TTT will be forty-four minutes longer, with more Gollum, more Merry and Pippin with the Ents.
Yay! And double yay!

*checking calendar, counting down the days for the DVD*


Ekaterina_dup1
(Ching Shih)
04/28/03 11:20 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Exxie:
So I have a question regarding Breakfast at Tiffany's, the book vs. the movie. One thing I've heard in passing is that the book's narrator is gay, whereas the same character in the movie is not.
I just finished re-reading the book, and there's nothing explicit that indicates the narrator is gay. I did see some on-line references to this as well, but they all just stated it as a fact. They didn't supply any inkling of where that idea comes from. Perhaps it's just supposed to be inferred from the fact that he and Holly have an intimate, yet platonic, relationship.


**DONOTDELETE**
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
04/29/03 02:34 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just saw Wonder Boys, after having read the book, and thought it was pretty well done - although I am hardly a good judge of cinematic anything. Some changes that I noticed made good sense (like removing the whole Passover seder scene), and others I wondered what the point was. Like changing Doctor Dee's name to Po, for instance, or having Tripp yell "Take a bow, James!" at the end, instead of Hannah. OK, these are insignificant, but I just wonder who decides these things? Is it like final touchups for the author?

In any case, I can't think of a better Tripp than Michael Douglas (even after having been anti-MD for several years due to his penchant for revealing his naked ass in every movie he was making) and Robert Downey Jr. is riveting - I can't take my eyes off him. I thought the ending of Wonder Boys was more touching on film than in the book, and that the character of Sara was significantly more likeable. But as has usually been the case for me, the most enjoyable aspects of the book do not make it to the screen, as in the case here of the omnipresent tuba, following Tripp from one place to the next. I loved that.


ice-queen
(Ching Shih)
04/29/03 05:00 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Jane.J:
[QB]I just saw Wonder Boys, after having read the book, and thought it was pretty well done - although I am hardly a good judge of cinematic anything.

major snip ...

I thought the film was all right but the soundtrack CD is great ... I play it often when I am domesticating around the place ... I know most of the song words (born in '57 yikes!) ... so it is very cosy ...


roggey
(Ching Shih)
04/30/03 09:01 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by FishDreamer:
nvilliers, Chicklit recently published an article written by Deirdre Swain, aka beastiegirl, on that very subject. It's here .
I read The Orchid Thief years before it hit the big screen (I just have this, this quirky karma about finding books before they are turned into movies). I didn't enjoy the movie, but I did enjoy reading the article you mentioned, FishDreamer \:\)


curlgirl
(Ching Shih)
04/30/03 11:01 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Well, for those of you are awaiting (eagerly or not) the movie version of I Capture the Castle, the official website has some nice pictures and such.

Jockney
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
04/30/03 04:22 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

According to UK Amazon, the book that The Ring (the Japanese version) is based on is going to be published later this year. I watched the film recently and it scared the living crap out of me, so I wondered if anyone was familiar with the original book? Has it been published in English anywhere else in the world?

Bear
(Ching Shih)
05/01/03 06:48 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Well, for those of you are awaiting (eagerly or not) the movie version of I Capture the Castle, the official website has some nice pictures and such.

God, I saw a trailer for it a while ago in the cinema, and when it began, with a simpering voiceover about coming to live in the castle, my sister and I just looked at each other in utter horror, going "it can't be...can it?" It looks like the most dreadfully cast thing ever. And the film tie-in edition of the book shows the girl playing Cassandra as a smiling, floral-tea-dress wearing '30s socialite, which is so farcically wrong. Ugh.


curlgirl
(Ching Shih)
05/01/03 09:35 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
God, I saw a trailer for it a while ago in the cinema, and when it began, with a simpering voiceover about coming to live in the castle, my sister and I just looked at each other in utter horror, going "it can't be...can it?" It looks like the most dreadfully cast thing ever. And the film tie-in edition of the book shows the girl playing Cassandra as a smiling, floral-tea-dress wearing '30s socialite, which is so farcically wrong. Ugh.
Well, I never said it was going to be good. I'm actually kind of scared by it, even though I haven't seen a preview of it yet.


goovie
(Ching Shih)
05/01/03 01:17 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by curlgirl:
Well, for those of you are awaiting (eagerly or not) the movie version of I Capture the Castle, the official website has some nice pictures and such.
The official website also has some lovely typos. Cassandra's "dairy?" I guess I skipped over that chapter. :p

The actors playing Cassandra, Rose, and Stephen look great to me. But as cute as Marc Blucas is, to me, he will always be The Potato.


Joss
(Ching Shih)
05/01/03 04:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Re: Breakfast at Tiffany's Does the assertion that the narrator is gay come from the fact that Truman Capote was gay? That's the only thing I can think of.

roggey
(Ching Shih)
05/02/03 02:35 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Joss:
Re: Breakfast at Tiffany's Does the assertion that the narrator is gay come from the fact that Truman Capote was gay? That's the only thing I can think of.
I'm trying to figure this out too, as this is the *first* I've heard of the gay factor in the book... Not one of my favorite reads, but interesting.


cherrybomb
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
05/02/03 03:04 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

i read white oleander last week, then rented the movie the other night. the book was very good, but sad and quite depressing. the movie was so-so. it would have been great if i hadn't read the book first (always) but they cut so much of the story out and changed the ending a bit.

blithe spirit
(Ching Shih)
05/16/03 07:17 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just read somewhere that there is a movie in the works starring (UGH) Lance Bass and Paris Hilton. The movie? An modern, updated version of The Great Gatsby.

I think I need to gag now.


blonde ambition
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
05/20/03 05:33 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Did anyone else see Stephen King's Dreamcatcher??? Was anyone else as upset as I was when I left the theater????

\:\) Melanie


voiceofreason
(Ching Shih)
05/20/03 10:24 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just watched the BBC version of this month's book club selection Strong Poison, and I was disappointed, unsurprisingly, I guess, considering how much I love the book. It was character stuff that bothered me; Peter told Harriet she should smile more -- that's such an asshole thing to say! Why would cool Peter say that? All the characters just felt sort of flat to me; the women were all much less strong. Flaky. Harriet wasn't hard enough, and Miss Climpson wasn't old enough, and Miss Murchison was wasn't brusque enough. And I thought that Eiluned should be femme and Sylvia butch. And (not that it's a big deal) why did they set it in the summer instead of winter?

I heard about that Great Gatsby movie. Horrors. Horrors!


roggey
(Ching Shih)
05/21/03 09:39 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by blonde ambition:
Did anyone else see Stephen King's Dreamcatcher??? Was anyone else as upset as I was when I left the theater????

\:\) Melanie
I stopped watching screen adaptions of King's work after "Maximum Overdrive." Ick.


majael
(Ching Shih)
05/21/03 10:59 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by roggey:
I stopped watching screen adaptions of King's work after "Maximum Overdrive." Ick.
So you missed The Shawshank Redemption? And Misery (which I didn't see but I understand it's supposed to be good)? And possibly Stand By Me (according to the IMDB, SBM came out the same year as MO, so I don't know which was first)? That's a big baby and not a lot of bathwater.


CheshireCat
(Ching Shih)
05/21/03 12:36 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

It gets to the point that the only good movies were originally books. You can really tell which ones were, even if you didn't know in advance that the movie was based on a book.

One book I really would like to read is Fight Club. In my American Lit class last semester, the class was trying to come up with films to watch at the end of the semester and someone suggested Fight Club, which I was all for, and then this obviously dumb woman protested obnoxiously about how it was so "gory" and wasn't really literature anyway, and as I was facilitating the discussion, I got particular pleasure out of telling her that it was in fact a book and was quite the cult classic before it was made into a movie.
She suggested we watch 9 to 5 starring Dolly Parton instead, and I thought she was joking, so I just laughed, which turned embarrassing for me when I discovered that she was quite serious. She told me that I couldn't possibly understand its importance because I come from a younger generation. Right.


Ekaterina_dup1
(Ching Shih)
05/21/03 01:06 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I didn't see Dreamcatcher, but I had the same reaction to the movie version of Dean Koontz's Watchers. That's the only Koontz book that I've enjoyed, but I enjoyed that book a LOT. (The main character, at least for me, is an irresistible genius Golden Retriever.) The movie starred one of the Coreys (Haim, I think), and was just awful. They took out any semblance of story to turn it into a creepy teen gorefest. Ick!

Stephsdad
(Ching Shih)
05/21/03 02:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Anyone see the Masterpiece theatre version of White Teeth. I enjoyed the book and taped the tv version but haven't watched it yet.

roggey
(Ching Shih)
05/21/03 02:52 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by majael:
So you missed The Shawshank Redemption? And Misery (which I didn't see but I understand it's supposed to be good)? And possibly Stand By Me (according to the IMDB, SBM came out the same year as MO, so I don't know which was first)? That's a big baby and not a lot of bathwater.
It may be a big baby and little bathwater that's being tossed out, but I just can't stand to see his work on the large or small screen. His work is such psychological horror that it the work ends up being cartoonish characters bumbling about the screen trying to convey the plots of the books/stories I've read. I respect his ability as a writer, but the movie/TV adaptions don't rate as high with me.


bonster
(Ching Shih)
05/21/03 08:44 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

oh roggey, go and rent The Shawshank Redemption now. Really.
No, really. I'm not the biggest Steven King fan in the world but I've read that story and seen that movie (a few times) and it not only does justice to the original work, it might just may change your mind about seeing Misery. Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman (what's not to like?). Watch it, you won't be disappointed.

I think there might just be an argument to be made that King's short stories are easier to adapt to the screen than his novels are (Stand by Me - good too).


PrimulaMary
(Ching Shih)
05/22/03 01:55 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by bonster:
oh roggey, go and rent The Shawshank Redemption now. Really.
No, really. I'm not the biggest Steven King fan in the world but I've read that story and seen that movie (a few times) and it not only does justice to the original work, it might just may change your mind about seeing Misery. Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman (what's not to like?). Watch it, you won't be disappointed.

I'll second the Shawshank recommendation. It's wonderful. I'm not a King fan at all - I don't think I'd even buy one of his works stuck in an airport for seven hours, surrounded only by Stephen King Only Bookstores - and share your feelings about most of the filmed versions of his work. But Shawshank is really pretty special.

Ummm... topic. Right, there it is. I've just re-read Proved Innocent, which is Gerry Conlon's autobiography, subsequently filmed as In the Name of the Father - a favourite of mine for a long time. It was difficult, at first, to get back into the book without hearing Daniel Day-Lewis and Emma Thompson, but I felt that knowing the movie more intimately than I know the book added layers to both for me as I read the book.

Does anyone else ever get that feeling when reading the book after seeing the film?


beastiegirl
(Ching Shih)
05/22/03 12:31 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Generally I prefer to see the film before I read the book, just because the book is almost always so much better and so the movie is not a disappointment. But I do find it hard to go back to the book after seeing the film. For instance, I normally read LOTR every spring and I haven't for the past 2 because seeing FOTR ruined the experience of reading the first book for me. I'm hoping if I give it enough time, I can go back and read it without being inundated with mental images of Elijah Wood.

However, I do agree that knowing the film can make you appreciate a book more. I saw High Fidelity before I read it, and although there's not much difference between the two, I appreciated the book for its Britishisms more than I might have had I not already seen the story transported to Chicago.


roggey
(Ching Shih)
05/22/03 01:41 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Okay, bonster and PrimulaMary \:\) I'll try viewing The Shawshank Redemption but I'm leery as that was one of my favorite shorts by King. I'll never watch Misery because I detest James Caan. I'll let you know how it pans out...

As for "I felt that knowing the movie more intimately than I know the book added layers to both for me as I read the book. Does anyone else ever get that feeling when reading the book after seeing the film?" Yes, I do feel this way, but only after watching the movie before reading the book. Dangerous Liaisons is the one I'm specifically speaking about in those terms.


lex
(Ching Shih)
06/04/03 10:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The Quiet American was excellent as both a book and a movie. I saw the movie first, and it made me want to read the book. I enjoyed both equally.

Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
06/05/03 09:38 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I've always thought the narrator in Breakfast at Tiffany's was supposed to be a stand-in for Capote. The narrator is a Southern boy, inexperienced in the big city, with aspirations to write. Also, he never falls for Holly's charms in a romantic way, and she never tries anything with him. And, given the way she was written, she managed to make all men fall in love with her.

And the best Stephen King movie, in my considered opinion, is De Palma's Carrie. The book itself is so slight and the movie is so much more. It's shocking and funny and harsh. And practically a classic.


water song
(Ching Shih)
06/05/03 10:57 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The previews for Seabisquit led me to read the book. Both the preview and the book are satisfying. In fact, both made me cry.

Now, if only the movie can live up to the book and the trailer...


bonster
(Ching Shih)
06/05/03 04:53 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
originally posted by roggey:
I'll never watch Misery because I detest James Caan.
Not even to watch him get tortured reeeealll gooood?

Ahem. Did anyone catch the American Film Institute's 100 years...100 heros and villains ? It's interesting that both the top hero, Atticus Finch, and the top villain, Hannibal Lecter, come from books and not from original screenplays.


fennel
(Ching Shih)
06/26/03 10:47 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Not sure if this is quite the right place to post this, but Tracey Chevalier's "Girl with a Pearl Earring" is being made into a movie. Colin Firth is playing Vermeer, and Scarlett Johansson is Griet.

Fingers crossed that it doesn't suck.


Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
06/26/03 01:16 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm actually quite excited about Cold Mountain becoming a film. What a cast! Including my new crush, Jack White...

swimmyfish
(Ching Shih)
06/30/03 09:20 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

This past weekend i found myself speaking to a gentleman who had just come from the Nantucket film festival, where they did a read-through of the movie script for A Confederacy of Dunces. Although the casting for the movie is not yet definite, except for Darlene, some of the main characters of the performance were:
Will Ferrell as Ignatius
Anne Meara as Mrs. Reilly
Drew Barrymore (who i think may be one of the producers, as well) as Darlene
Olympia Dukakis as Miss Trixie.

Anne Meara as Mrs. Reilly strikes me as very inspired casting. The rest i'm not totally excited about, to be honest.

Also, very wishful thinking on my part, but if the movie really does get made, i'm hoping (with fingers crossed, even!) that they get Chris Rock to play Jones. He's the only person i can imagine in that role who would be able to pull it off without being totally annoying or too much of a caricature.


AltoidsAddict
(Ching Shih)
06/30/03 01:20 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Lemony Snicket.
Jim Carrey.
God is dead.


Barncat
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
06/30/03 06:22 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

A couple of people mentioned Wings of the Dove. This is one of the few books that I've bought but haven't been able to finish. At least once a year I try to read this book but I never make it past page 50. I rented the movie to perhaps revive my interest, but I hated the movie as well \:\( . Ah well, I think I'll give it another try.

graceless
(Ching Shih)
07/02/03 02:52 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Will Ferrell as Ignatius
Really! I kept hearing about Philip Seymour Hoffman.


hopechaser
(Ching Shih)
07/07/03 10:42 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Will Ferrell as Ignatius
Anne Meara as Mrs. Reilly
Drew Barrymore (who i think may be one of the producers, as well) as Darlene
Olympia Dukakis as Miss Trixie.
Meara and Dukakis, oh yeah. But oh holy lord, Will Ferrell? Drew Barrymore? Did the producers actually read the book?

Oh wait, Barrymore is one of the producers. Got it.

fyi - just did some internet research and found that Mos Def has been cast too. A couple of sites still indicate Philip Seymour Hoffman so I'll keep my fingers crossed. That dude is magnificent!


devilbrat1
(Ching Shih)
07/10/03 11:44 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by graceless:
 Quote:
Will Ferrell as Ignatius
Really! I kept hearing about Philip Seymour Hoffman.
PSH is the only I can picture in the role of Ignatius. He just seems perfect for the role. Has no one seen "Happiness"?


Lena
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
07/10/03 03:15 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm one of those people who when they hear a film is coming out go and read the book. then i quite often don't see the film after loving the book as I think it'll ruin it. Captain Corellis Mandolin being one.

I'm actually quite surprised how many people like the LOTR films and didn't mind the changes he made. I thought the first one was pretty good (I was expecting it to be awful) but the bits he added in TTT completely ruined it for me. Faramir is one of my favourite characters and in the book he is like an opposite to Boromir whereas in the film the 2 were portrayed as being very similar. Grrr.
However, I do think that the Lord of the Rings was a much better adaptation than some. Harry Potter in particular annoyed. I adore the books and the adults were all fantastic in their roles but the kids were terrible and the castle wasn't dark and castley enough and god, I had so many problems with those films. I felt the second was better (mostly because it was truer to the book) but am dreading the third.

About a Boy was a good adaptation of an excellent book but I have yet to watch High Fidelity. I've actually had Chocolat on my shelf for ages but haven't watched it because I know they changed the ending to make it more romantic. Uuughh.


harper
(Ching Shih)
07/13/03 03:31 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

i just heard that deborah moggach's tulip fever is being made into a movie with jude law playing the painter. good casting choice! it looks like keira knightley (bend it like beckham and pirates of the carribean) might be on board to play the female lead at the center of the story.

[shameless self-promotion]tulip fever was included in the book bundle i wrote a couple of years ago on fiction featuring dutch art (mostly vermeer). those of you who weren't around back then may be interested.[/shameless self-promotion]

girl with a pearl earring was also part of the book bundle, and i am beyond thrilled to hear that colin firth is playing vermeer in the film adaptation. thanks for that good news, fennel!


graceless
(Ching Shih)
09/05/03 09:49 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I find it laughable when it seems the filmakers didn't even read the book they are adapting to the screen, case in point The Last of the Mohicans. Pretty much everything from the novel - which is not a fave of mine - is taken out and replaced with love triangles, settlers and new characters.

sezin
(Ching Shih)
09/10/03 09:55 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

one case where i thought the movie was loads better than the book is in the case of chuck palahniuk (sp?) and fight club . i found the book absotely garbled nonsense, not a hint of a coherent thought in his mishmash of violence. the screenwriter is the one who managed to make a fantastic and coherent story out of palahniuk's mess and i love that movie so much. that book, bleh. isn't he lucky he had a discerning reader who managed to make some art of his drivel.

i thought the film version of the english patient was quite racist, actually. the indian guy played quite a central role in the book, as well as being a love interest to that nurse woman. the movie managed to just water him down to nothing which i see all the time in films with 'south' asian characters. being half sri lankan and loving the movies, it gets my goat every time there is an opportunity for a role model in a film and the white filmmakers erase them.

the only stephen king adaptations i have appreciated were the shawshank redemption and the green mile . needful things wasn't bad but it did not have the raw intensity of the novel in any way, shape or form. most of the film versions are the most petty representations of king's worlds and although i tend to see the movies hopefully, i usually end up disappointed. i haven't seen dreamcatcher yet and as usual feel my pre-viewing anxiety as to whether they will screw it up as usual.

i have mixed feelings about books becoming movies as reading can be such a personal experience. i would love to see a film of louise erdrich's books, but know that a film could never capture all of the nouances and plot twists, and would probably cheapen her poetry. same with margaret atwood when you look at the pathetic attempt they made at the handmaid's tale . alice hoffman too, practical magic i like to consider as two works of art and almost not related as the film was good, but really nothing like the book. different interpretations of the same idea. if all directors were brilliant then i would trust them more with my favorite authors, but most of the time i find that they pollute pure ideas with their flashy filmmaking.


mollym
(Ching Shih)
09/10/03 01:02 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

sezin, I entirely agree with you about The English Patient -- I didn't hate the movie, as a story of its own, but I didn't think it had much to do with the book, where Kip and Hana are definitely the central characters, Kip's backstory is the most interesting, and their parting is the most painful moment. And I agree that racism must have played a role -- it's not like Kip's story doesn't have lots of visual moments, defusing bombs on hillsides, but also the message of their story is profoundly about racism and the atomic bomb, and it's telling that the movie didn't do that justice.

YesABibliophile
(Ching Shih)
09/10/03 01:24 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Under the Tuscan Sun - the only thing remotely in common with one of my favorite books is that it was filmed in Tuscany. *throws hands up and walks away mumbling under breath*

sezin
(Ching Shih)
09/10/03 04:08 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by mollym:
sezin, I entirely agree with you about The English Patient -- I didn't hate the movie, as a story of its own, but I didn't think it had much to do with the book, where Kip and Hana are definitely the central characters, Kip's backstory is the most interesting, and their parting is the most painful moment. And I agree that racism must have played a role -- it's not like Kip's story doesn't have lots of visual moments, defusing bombs on hillsides, but also the message of their story is profoundly about racism and the atomic bomb, and it's telling that the movie didn't do that justice.
thank you, mollym! been saying this for years and most people have not read the book so look at me like i am insane for wasting my time with a book when there is a movie. such a gorgeous book though, and the movie certainly did at least create an accurate portrait of the landscape, no?


Catness
(Ching Shih)
09/10/03 08:21 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by sezin:
alice hoffman too, practical magic i like to consider as two works of art and almost not related as the film was good, but really nothing like the book. different interpretations of the same idea. if all directors were brilliant then i would trust them more with my favorite authors, but most of the time i find that they pollute pure ideas with their flashy filmmaking.
I think we talked about this movie and book, sezin. I'm not a huge fan of the movie, although I loved the book. The film though, had that wonderful bit in the middle in which the wild one drives across the country in one night to be with her sister who is in deep mourning. That part? That, they got right. I thought it was the truest moment in the whole film.


**DONOTDELETE**
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
09/10/03 09:18 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by hula:
I read Bastard out of Carolina this summer and wondered whether the movie would be any where near as good. Anyone read/seen them both?

I'd like to watch the movie, but not if I'm going to have some godawful Simon Birch experience.
I didn't even know "Bastard out of Carolina" was a book! It was on the Lifetime movie network last week however Ithink there was some material that was cut from the cable version.

I"m trying to think of some books that were ruined or different from the movie.

If Jurassic Park was true to the book, it would've had so much violence that a crowd of children couldn't take it and it would be rated R. I thought the book was so much better.

White Oleander - I'm not a fan of Oprah's book club but this book was on sale at Media Play so I bought it. I thought it was great! The movie didn't do the book justice. There were parts that were different from the book.

Jaws - Different ending and for those of you who haven't read it, The Brodys had 3 kids, not two like in the movie and Ellen knew Matt Hooper from her college days. Chief Brody doesn't shoot the shark. I would have to say the movie was better than the book.

There are some books I would like to read that were made into movies like Housekeeping. I thought that movie was excellent. Christine Lahti was wonderful as the crazy aunt.


Zuzu Petals
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
10/23/03 03:30 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by devilbrat1:
 Quote:
Originally posted by graceless:
 Quote:
Will Ferrell as Ignatius
Really! I kept hearing about Philip Seymour Hoffman.
PSH is the only I can picture in the role of Ignatius. He just seems perfect for the role. Has no one seen "Happiness"?
It is official ... Will Farrell is Ignatious . Here is the cast list.

Drew Barrymore .... Darlene
Mos Def .... Jones
Olympia Dukakis .... Santa Battaglia
Will Ferrell .... Ignatius J. Reilly
Lily Tomlin .... Mrs. Reilly

Somebody shoot me now - Drew Barrymore?

This is coming from someone who has seen Never Been Kissed more times then I should ...

And I love Will Farrel, but I think that Paul Giamatti would have been perfect.

Sobbing quietly in NY.

ZP


SunRaspSoak
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
10/26/03 12:02 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I personally rather liked the film (starring Whoopie Goldeberg) 'The Colour Purple'. I often can't turn of my book-memory when watching adaptions, but in this I could.

HonestClown
(Ching Shih)
11/12/03 09:11 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I started watching the "Jewel in the Crown" miniseries. I attempted to read the book a while back but could never get more than half-way through.

I'm really enjoying the mini-series, but I was wondering how true is it to the novel(s) (as it's based on the entire Raj Quartet, if I'm not mistaken)


Argonaut
(Ching Shih)
11/13/03 04:11 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by SunRaspSoak:
I personally rather liked the film (starring Whoopie Goldeberg) 'The Colour Purple'. I often can't turn of my book-memory when watching adaptions, but in this I could.
Alice Walker was an advisor of sorts on the set of the movie. In fact, she wrote a book in the mid-90s about the process of making the film. I believe it's called The Same River Twice: Honoring the Difficult. I wrote a paper about it as an undergrad.


mollym
(Ching Shih)
11/13/03 04:23 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

HonestClown, the mini-series is incredibly faithful to the book, as I recollect. They had to do some stuff with the time sequencing -- the same incidents are described by different people in the books -- but they did an amazing job overall. Mostly great casting, too.

orchid314
(Ching Shih)
11/13/03 05:52 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Honest Clown, as I remember, the Jewel in the Crown TV series was very faithful to the spirit of the books. There was some compression in the show, particularly in the characters' relationships in the final book, but I thought it did a great job of capturing the identities of each character. I found Paul Scott had a tendency to ramble on and repeat himself quite a bit and, in fact, would probably say that I enjoyed the TV adaptation more than the original book, which I almost never do. It's completely engrossing and I envy anyone watching it for the first time!

michelleb
(Ching Shih)
11/14/03 03:36 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm about to miss my train but I have to add this:

The Power of One - quite possibly the only film that has ever made me want to go out and shake the author and say "What the hell were you thinking when you agreed to be an adivsor on this film?! Have you no dignity????????!!!!!!!"

rant, rave, cry - I loved this book soooooooooooo much. Why? Why? Why???


Daisy Duke
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/14/03 02:36 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I have a theory that the lousier the Stephen King book (I adore the man's writing but not EVERYTHING he's written) the better the movie.

Hence the awfulness of the Nicholson The Shining. Amazing, tragic, beautiful book. Movie with axe murderer and dead magic black man. Ick. And no one is ever surprised Jack Nicholson is evil. Ever. I'm surprised he's not evil in real life.

The movie Carrie, on the other hand, was really, really good, and the book was only meh.

With this theory in mind, I'm sure Dreamcatcher: Tommyknockers Wasn't Adequately Disgusting will be the best movie in the history of the world.


ken_m
(Ching Shih)
11/14/03 03:30 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Daisy Duke:
With this theory in mind, I'm sure Dreamcatcher: Tommyknockers Wasn't Adequately Disgusting will be the best movie in the history of the world.
I never saw the movie version of Dreamcatcher. But I hear it sucked almost as much as the book did.

The really strange thing, to me, about movies based on King is that fidelity to the book does not seem to be a problem, and yet the movies still suck. The Dark Half and Needful Things for example, were almost scene-for-scene perfect renditions of the book to the screen, but somehow, along the way, everything good about the book got squeezed out. My suspicion is that when reading you

get the asides that look like this

get a glimpse into what the characters are thinking, and most actors just can't pull that off.


Catness
(Ching Shih)
11/14/03 03:46 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Mr Catness and I watched Dreamcatcher this past weekend. It was not good.

Yeah. Not good in a way that leaves me with nothing else to say but that.


Daisy Duke
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/19/03 01:49 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Yeah, Ken_m, it's the psyche of the characters that make the stories frightening. It's the combination of being able to identify with the characters, I think, combined with the bubbling madness of it all.

And the movies don't give you that, so they rely on The Man With An Axe, or the equivalent, which is not nearly as scary.


ramblergirl
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
11/20/03 08:58 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by fennel:
Not sure if this is quite the right place to post this, but Tracey Chevalier's "Girl with a Pearl Earring" is being made into a movie. Colin Firth is playing Vermeer, and Scarlett Johansson is Griet.

Fingers crossed that it doesn't suck.
I saw it last week, ans then rushed to buy the book. I loved the movie and at first thought the book was merely OK by comparison. Later I changed my mind (the book is very good) , so now I have to see the movie again to compare. Of course, as the story is very visual, a movie as a medium is better equipped to handle it. I thought it was very well done and Scarlett Johanssen is wonderful.

Another adaptation that I love is LOTR. I read the books and became a fan long before the movieswere made, but the only big problem I have with Peter Jackson's vision is Faramir. I could see nothing of his compassion and warmth and sadness in the movie character.

Still, I think the LOTR movies are a wonderful piece of movie-making. They can appeal on their own, and I know many people who were drawn to Middle-Earth world by them. Harry Potter movies, however, are too close to the books and seem just like an illustration, fun but not really necessary. The grown-up cast is excellent, though. Could one wish for a better Snape?

I also love L.A. Confidential. I haven't read the book yet but from what I can see, it must be very difficult to adapt. Can anyone tell me if the screenplay is really that good in comparison to the book?


Emily
(Ching Shih)
11/20/03 07:23 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The movie adaptation of LA Confidential covers less than half of the material in the book - the story is simplified, condensed and made significantly less violent/gory/disturbing. It's a watered-down version; but to be honest, I liked the movie version better. James Ellroy writes like he wants you to feel like you've just been punched and are bracing yourself for the next blow.

Watched Mystic River recently. The movie was very close in plot and spirit to the book; so close, in fact, that it felt a little pointless to me. It's odd - the plot is so (deliberately) predictable that knowing what's going to happen should not lessen the impact of the movie at all. But I just sat there anticipating certain scenes, then watching them without much emotional response. It played out on screen nearly exactly as it did in my head when I read the novel. Blah. But if they'd thrown in some wild plot twists I wouldn't have liked that either. I don't know.

I guess I prefer 'unfilmable' books made into movies that stray far from the source material(LoTR, Wonder Boys, LA Confidential) to movies that faithfully recreate the book (Mystic River, Harry Potter).


Catness
(Ching Shih)
11/21/03 10:43 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I was thinking this morning as I made my coffee, that it might be fun to do an "Is This Picture Worth a Thousand Words?" feature on movie adaptations of Dr Seuss books. Then I remembered that when the horrible, nightmarish Grinch came out a couple of years ago, I swore I would go to the grave without seeing it. So that strikes that one.

Now I cannot escape the saturation marketing of this season's apparently joyless and mirthless Cat in the Hat adaptation. Won't see that one either.

(You have to view a short advertisement to read the articles in the above links.)

To sum up: the Grinch was not opposed to Christmas because he had a bad childhood, he just had a heart that was three sizes too small; and the Cat in the Hat would not leer laciviously at a picture of the children's mother.

Audrey Geisel should be ashamed of herself.


carrotbat
(Ching Shih)
11/21/03 10:53 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
the Cat in the Hat would not leer laciviously at a picture of the children's mother.
I'm glad I'm not the only one seriously annoyed by that part of the ad.


Catness
(Ching Shih)
11/21/03 11:08 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

"Annoyed" doesn't begin to cover it for me, carrotbat. Mr Catness and I endured a trailer for "Cat" when we went to a showing of "Lost in Translation." I believe the words "appalled" "disgusted" "outraged" and "flabbergasted" were used by both of us. It was all I could do to keep Mr Catness in his seat. He sat there alternately growling and seething, ready to throw elbows, muttering something about "stop ruining my childhood..."

I think I'm going to have to run our video of the original, Dr Seuss-approved, Chuck Jones-animated, Boris Karloff-narrated "Grinch" adaptation repeatedly this year just to soothe his ire.


JaneJ
(Ching Shih)
11/21/03 12:02 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I don't know...

I really love Cat in the Hat the book, but the actual Cat? Is kind of a jerk, as far as I'm concerned, and would be capable of making that kind of remark. (Just because the cat picks up all the things that were down doesn't mean he's learned anything. He always picks up all his playthings, as opposed to Grinch who is enlightened by story's end...I can't believing I'm giving these characters that much depth!)

Long story short: I don't want to see the movie, either, but it has more to do with the fact that any 2-hour movie based on a 20-odd-page book, you know will stray from the original creation.


FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
11/21/03 03:39 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Not going to see The Cat in the Hat. Not! Completely not interested.

The year that Grinch movie came out, I had to endure it on the plane to my in-laws for Christmas and then again when we got there, because Mr D's mom got it for Christmas. I refused to watch either time, but both times I couldn't completely avoid both sound and picture. Irk! Even if I do think Christine Baranski is fabulous.

I am very picky about what I'm willing to spend that kind of time on, so I don't go to the movies often.


graceless
(Ching Shih)
11/22/03 10:46 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I recently read The Wings of the Dove for a college course and midway through the novel that class was invited to a screening of the 1997 film. I can understand that Hollywood wants to trim a 700 page book - my copy has that many pages - into a much more audience-friendly two hour film, but the film it seems is not even based on the same story. Same characters, different backgrounds, somewhat different agendas. It took me about 30 minutes to recognize anything remotely similar to how it appeared in the book. And usually I adore Helena Bonham-Carter, but here she looks sickly, and I wished she had played sickly Milly instead.

essay
(Ching Shih)
11/23/03 10:01 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

graceless, I decided to finally read Wings of the Dove right around the time the movie came out. I loved the book and was very disappointed with the movie. Having broken down and watched a couple of film adaptations of James, I am beginning to be of the opinion that he can't be filmed. Even when it seems faithful, it seems to somehow miss the point entirely. But Wings of the Dove was particularly enfuriating. It's too far back to actually remember why, other than that the director's resolution of the story seemed very unJamesian. I am tipping toward not wanting to see movies of books I've read or may at some point want to read. There are exceptions, but they are few and far between. Right now, I think it will be no on The Human Stain, but possibly yes on Master and Commander. The first I've read and don't feel that I need any further elucidation from a movie. The second I haven't, and have heard good things about.

blithe spirit
(Ching Shih)
11/25/03 10:28 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Oh my God, I just read that Hallmark is doing a new tv movie adaption of A Christmas Carol with Tori Spelling playing Scrooge.

I think I need to go and throw up now.


Anne Wentworth
(Ching Shih)
12/01/03 01:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just saw Master and Commander and really liked it a lot (especially Russell Crowe). Throughout the film, though, I couldn't stop thinking of Persuasion. "Oh, that's what Dick Musgrove did when he was a midshipman." "Oh, that's what Frederick was like as Captain." That made a good move, for me, even better.

Edited because I apparently can't spell my own husband's name \:\)


Lady Di
(Ching Shih)
12/01/03 01:41 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I think Hollywood is running out of ideas for movies.

I haven't seen The Cat & the Hat & I don't thing it would be worth the $10.00.


Promethea
(Ching Shih)
12/01/03 04:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Anne, have you read the books? Because in the second book, Post Captain, there's a situation that even more closely parallels Persuasion. Basically, Jack's beloved (sorry, no other word for it) is persuaded to give him up because he has poor prospects.

TraceyB
(Ching Shih)
12/01/03 04:48 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Anne W. and Promethea, I understand that Post Captain was written as an homage to Jane Austen. The Twin Cities chapter of the Jane Austen Society of North America read Post Captain a year or so ago for that reason.

As I'm going through the O'Brian books, I'm discovering the little bits they picked out to put in the movie. One of the major dramatic scenes in the movie was from H.M.S. Surprise, the third book. With 20 books, they had a lot of material to pick from!


Anne Wentworth
(Ching Shih)
12/02/03 01:48 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Promethea and TraceyB, I didn't know that about Post Captain. I've only read (coincidentally) Master and Commander and The Far Side of the World-- although I read both of them about five years ago.

Fortunately my dad owns the whole collection, so I know what I'll be reading the next time I head to my parents' house.


Promethea
(Ching Shih)
12/03/03 03:51 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I didn't know it was explicitly done as a homage, but it makes sense.

There is one really hilarious scene in Post Captain which, if they ever make another movie, I think HAS to go in. I'll spoiler space:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Jack and Stephen are in France when war breaks out, so they have to escape - Jack disguised as a dancing BEAR. So funny.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.


eanja
(Ching Shih)
12/03/03 12:23 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

That's one of those scenes that is surficially funny, but must have been quite dreadful for the participant.

I don't think the following is a spoiler, as it is utterly meaningless outside the context of one non-plot essential conversation from a later book.

If they make more films, I sincerely hope they include Stephen's immortal line: "Sir, you have debauched my sloth!"


TraceyB
(Ching Shih)
12/03/03 01:13 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Oh my dear Lord, eanja, that's one of the best sentences in all of modern literature. The Sloth Episode so deserves to be in a movie.

Promethea
(Ching Shih)
12/03/03 05:57 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Hee - that is a great bit! The poor thing.

(Is there a Patrick O'Brien thread here?)


Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
12/03/03 06:33 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Probably time to start one.

Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
12/09/03 06:23 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
I guess I prefer 'unfilmable' books made into movies that stray far from the source material(LoTR, Wonder Boys, LA Confidential) to movies that faithfully recreate the book (Mystic River, Harry Potter).
It's funny that you should say this, because I had the exact same experience with To Kill A Mockingbird years ago. The movie is considered an American classic and extremely faithful to the book, and the first time I saw it I grew so bored I wandered away from the TV. It followed so faithfully, and all the actors matched up so closely, that there was no frission on interest at all. And sadly, even when the adaptation is perfectly rendered, the images can't match the vivacity of the words in your head.

Which devolved into my policy of never seeing a film just because I loved the book. If it transgresses too much on the material, I get annoyed and contemptuous (The House of Mirth). If the movie is generally faithful, I'm bored (High Fidelity).

And essay, there are actually two Jamesian film adaptations that are quite good, though not recent. The Jack Clayton directed The Innocents is in some ways better than the "The Turn of the Screw." It's one of the most original and fresh-feeling horror movies ever made; it's subtly terrifying, it's visually beautiful and Deborah Kerr is great. Also gotta love the spooky little kid actors.

And the The Heiress from "Washington Square" is much much better than the recent feminist reinvention. This one stars Olivia de Havilland and Monty Clift, both of whom are superb and pretty the entire reason to see this movie--along with Ralph Richardson, who's exactly as I imagined the icy father. The movie soft pedals it a little in the end, but I think that was smart because James is so brutal and I don't know if the any movie that heartless could be accepted by an audience.


lily
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
12/13/03 10:41 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

My English finals barely ended and I already had another book in my hand. This one was The Great Gatsby. Yes, I know everybody was most likely assigned to read it in high school, but my school sucked and decided to show us the film instead. That was a long time ago, but I still have Robert Redford and Mia Farrow locked in the roles of Gatsby and Daisy. That is until I saw the new No Doubt video remaking the hit 80's song, 'It's My Life'. (Very cool vid. Was set in the glamourous roaring 20's) Throughout the entire reading of TGG I kept picturing Gwen Stefani as Daisy. Now that would make for an interesting film version.(Oh...and I kept Robert Redford)

Emily
(Ching Shih)
12/18/03 09:40 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Anyone else ever have a book poisoned by the movie version?

I started re-reading Possession tonight. It's been years since I picked it up, and I remember absolutely loving it. But since then I've watched the movie version - and somehow it's corrupted my ability to read the book. I didn't hate the movie. If it had simply been a movie, not based on this book, I probably would have loved it. As it was I only half-watched it on HBO. But now the movie Roland - the very pretty, somewhat arrogant, fashionable American - keeps creeping into my reading. This mucks up all the dynamics. The dusty academic settings are now quite lovely & gorgeously filmed, in my head. Worst of all, the whole thing has the sterile cleanness, this *chill* to it that I think it mostly from the movie as well.

Ah well, I'm only 50 pages into it & it's quite a hefty book, maybe I'll get over the movie. But I really wish I'd never watched it.


Promethea
(Ching Shih)
12/19/03 05:36 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I felt like that too but I DID hate the movie. I had read the book before though so I hope when I re-read it none of that comes in - I don't think it will, because the movie was so limp and lame by comparison that it's not strong enough to stay in my mind.

nanliza
(Ching Shih)
12/19/03 06:25 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm always frightened of seeing the film of a book I love for that exact reason; in case the actors get into my head and I can never picture the characters the way I want to again. I know that's why my sister has never seen the Harry Potter films, and even refuses to watch the trailers or anything, so that as far as possible she doesn't know what the actors look like.

Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
12/19/03 01:52 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I remembered this old topic and thought I'd give it a bump. It's sort of similar to what you all are talking about here, but it's a great thread.

Anne Wentworth
(Ching Shih)
12/19/03 04:38 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Emily and Promethea, I actually saw the movie before reading Possession and found that the book characters were so different from the movie characters (so much more alive and real, in addition to having quite different characteristics and qualities in many cases). I was able to make up my own versions of all teh major characters in my head, and the settings, too. The one scene that I imagine fairly similarly to the movie was the epilogue. And the one character who's movie version I couldn't get out of my head was Blanche.

I liked the movie when I saw it, but it was no comparison to how I loved the book.


Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
12/20/03 05:07 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Anyone else ever have a book poisoned by the movie version?
Nope. Usually the opposite. Words are vivid to me in a ways that images aren't, and not even the most charismatic of actors can change my view of a character in a book.

The universe of the printed world is just so enveloping for me. I've had instances where I've loved the movie, read the book, then had my whole interpretation & satisfaction with the movie altered by the reading.

Then there's the case of Silence of the Lambs--the book and movie are both wonderful creations, and in my mind, they've melded together quite satisfactorily. Every time I leaf through the book I see Jodie Foster, and I love it. She's the living image and spirit of Clarice Starling for me, and Anthony Hopkins to a great degree is Hannibal, though I think in his case he adds a great deal of himself to the role that's not there on the page, it's a welcom addition.


StephA
(Ching Shih)
12/23/03 11:11 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Emily:
Anyone else ever have a book poisoned by the movie version?
Not poisoned, exactly, but for a while I did find it difficult to reread Circle of Friends without thinking of the annoying and contrived ending of the movie. It wasn't a BAD ending, neccessarily, but ... the book had a perfectly good ending! (And a lot of the rest of the movie was SO good and SO well done and true to the book that it just felt so Disney-fied.)


Anne Wentworth
(Ching Shih)
12/23/03 11:33 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

As a reverse of the original topic posted here, I find I often want to see simply terrible movies puely because of the books they're based on.

Right now I'm fighting my urge to go see Cheaper By the Dozen. It looks pretty bad, and nothing like the book, but I loved that book so much when I was young that I can't help wanting to see it. And I know I'll be disapointed.


Rain
(Ching Shih)
12/23/03 01:50 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

As far as I can tell from the trailers, the only thing "Cheaper by the Dozen", the movie, has in common with the book is the title and the fact that there are 12 siblings.

I loved that book so much when I was a kid. I amused a party full of people recently by becoming enraged when the trailer for Cheaper by the Dozen came on the TV (very unlike me, but it was the first I'd heard of the movie, and I was really upset!)

I hate it when stupid movies are made from good books. This one bugs me particularly strongly, though, and I'm not sure why.

It has, however, made me want to reread the book, and I'm currently trying to figure out if I may still have a copy at my parents' house, or if I'm going to have to seek out a new one.


Sharysa
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
12/26/03 12:57 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm sort of in the middle of movie adaptions. Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, and definitely The Last Unicorn. I'm not saying they're the perfect adaptions, because Harry's eyes are supposed to be GREEN, and the cover picture of Chamber of Secrets clearly shows Elijah Wood-like BLUE eyes! The special effects are a step away from being the worst I've ever seen, especially the centaur! Er... I'm still in the middle. Never mind the special effects part.

viva
(Ching Shih)
12/26/03 10:21 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Emily:
Anyone else ever have a book poisoned by the movie version?
Unfortunately. I had seen Practical Magic a number of times, and didn't know it was a book until recently. I just finished the book, and must confess that I skimmed through it, just looking for the parts in the movie that I liked - of which there were few, given the plot divergence between the movie & the book. I think I would have liked the book otherwise, so I am going to give another Alice Hoffman book a shot.

ETA that I felt the same way about the Circle of Friends ending! The book ending was much better. Why she (the main character, whose name I forget) would want to go back to a cheating ass is beyond me.


rh dorsty
(Ching Shih)
12/26/03 10:32 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I am usually able to see a book and a movie version of a book as two separate entities, and not be unduly upset by the way the book is translated into film.

But two that really annoyed me:

Possession : I think they ruined the poignancy of the story by making both the leads so damned gorgeous, and
The Shipping News : Kevin Spacey was tolerable, but the beautiful and ethereal Marianne Moore was so completely miscast that I could barely watch the thing.

Of course, I avoided the "based on the novel" version of A Prayer For Owen Meany like the plague. No way was I going to watch anyone sully that for me.


CheshireCat
(Ching Shih)
12/26/03 08:52 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

What the hell's wrong with Drew Barrymore?

StephA
(Ching Shih)
12/29/03 02:12 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by rh dorsty:
Of course, I avoided the "based on the novel" version of A Prayer For Owen Meany like the plague. No way was I going to watch anyone sully that for me.
There is a Paper Jam article about that, if you're interested, rh dorsty. It lives here: http://www.chicklit.com/paperjam/paperjam17.html .


MarianGriswold
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
12/29/03 06:47 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by CheshireCat:
What the hell's wrong with Drew Barrymore?
Somewhere in the past few weeks I read that a lot of people have optioned Confederacy of Dunces but that it never goes anywhere. I'm hoping that this is a case just like that.

In the meantime, www.ignatiuswantsyou.com has assembled a list of the addresses of the idiots working on this with hopes that enough people will tell them to get lost.


StephA
(Ching Shih)
01/13/04 01:18 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by fennel:
Not sure if this is quite the right place to post this, but Tracey Chevalier's "Girl with a Pearl Earring" is being made into a movie. Colin Firth is playing Vermeer, and Scarlett Johansson is Griet. Fingers crossed that it doesn't suck.
For what it's worth, Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper have given Girl with a Pearl Earring good reviews.


heyalice
(Ching Shih)
01/13/04 03:58 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Girl With A Pearl Earring is a lovely little movie. Haven't read the book, some folks I know who have said it's boring as all hell.

SeattleShrew
(Ching Shih)
01/13/04 04:04 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by rh dorsty:


Possession : I think they ruined the poignancy of the story by making both the leads so damned gorgeous
I agree re Roland, but Maud is presented in the book as quite gorgeous. Not a big Gwyneth fan in general, but I think physically she was just right for Maud, your prototypical "cool blonde."

In the book, the barriers between Maud and Roland complicate the development of the romance. She’s beautiful, he’s ordinary; she’s upper class, he’s not; she’s successful in her field, he isn’t yet; she’s confident, he’s shy. So she’s “above” him in all these ways, screwing with everyone’s expectations re gender. By making Roland a brash handsome American, all that is erased, for no good reason I can see.


Promethea
(Ching Shih)
01/13/04 08:10 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I do agree except - Aaron Eckhardt is regarded as handsome? Really? O-kay. It annoyed me also because of the basic fact that they're the 'underdogs' racing to get the letters because the American library has so much more money. If Roland also comes from an American institution, that becomes moot and therefore there isn't the same drama or impetus that bonds them together, breaking down their initial reserve.

However, I did think that Jeremy Northam and Jennifer Ehle were excellent in their sections of the film.


SeattleShrew
(Ching Shih)
01/13/04 08:22 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

heh. Aaron Eckhart doesn't blow my hair back either, but he's presented as handsome, also manly and masterful, as in the scene in which he rips of clothing and dives into lake. Completely out of character for the Roland in the book, I say.

Agree re Jennifer Ehle and Jeremy Northam. One thing the film did get right is that these Victorians, with so many more pressures and barriers, aren't nearly as repressed as ironic po-mo late 20th century academics. The love scenes were nicely done.


deborahAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
03/09/04 07:20 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Sigh.

FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
03/09/04 07:27 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Oh Deborah, ICK! I can't even begin to imagine what that's going to do to ruin those books!

I found this casting decision for The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe today. I don't know how I feel about this. She's tall enough, and I think has the acting ability, but The White Witch is supposed to be big and imposing, and I just don't see it. Someone more like Lucy Lawless, or anyone I see more as an ass-kicker rather than beautiful and wily but physically fragile.


heyalice
(Ching Shih)
03/09/04 07:45 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Hollywood is in such a rush to cash in on the success of LOTR that they fail to realize is that it was a seven year journey for Peter Jackson and Co. I just hope proper care is taken with these classics.
And I have a fourteen year old who will be quite disappointed if LEMONY SNICKET is ruined...


Mistral
(Ching Shih)
03/09/04 10:53 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

deborah, I'm literally feeling nauseous about that link, especially thinking about Deenie. And imagine what they'll do with Are You There God, It's Me, Margaret?, which was the first book I ever read that had a protagonist with my situation of one Christian parent and one Jewish parent, both of whom decided to let me make up my own mind about religion.

Also, here\'s a link about the upcoming Ender's Game movie. If they ever make it - it's been in the works for years now.


Bear
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 05:49 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
First on the development list will be "Deenie," about a young teenage girl seeking to define herself beyond the wishes of her parents.
No it's not! It's about scaring the crap out of all its readers who will be convinced that they too have scoliosis and will have to spend years encased in a hideous back brace! Maybe that was just me.

Also, aren't they going to have to set Deenie in the '70s? I bet back braces (and probably scoliosis treatement in general) have advanced quite a lot since the book was written.

As for Nicole Kidman...I dunno. I think it could work, although I am dreading those films and think they will be pretty bad. I don't think the White Witch is really an ass-kicking type - she just has to be scary and imposing rather than physically tough, and I think Kidman could pull that off.


dazey
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 06:05 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
No it's not! It's about scaring the crap out of all its readers who will be convinced that they too have scoliosis and will have to spend years encased in a hideous back brace! Maybe that was just me.
Nope, not just you. My paranoia wasn't helped by the fact that my mum worked with kids many of whom had severe scoliosis. She became convinced that her perceptions were so skewed that she wouldn't recognise scoliosis in me or my sister, so used to check us about once a month throughout our early teens. I tend to the view that physiotherapists should be closely supervised as parents.

Ahem. Back to topic: they really would have to set Blume's books when they were written, I think. What about Forever? (Someone had to be the first to mention it!) In a context where, you know, people should really think about HIV and other STIs when they're thinking about having sex, the choices in that book are terrible! (Leaving aside creepy coercive Michael and his penis, Ralph.) And, actually, Are you there God? is very much of its moment too.

Still, if they're aiming the films at kids and teenagers, they're bound to set them in the present. And I will be disappointed.


Bear
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 07:00 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Ugh. Ralph. Actually, I'm surprised that book hasn't been retrospectively claimed by the creepy abstinence movement, because although I know Blume meant well, Michael and the fact he called his penis "Ralph" was so creepy it was enough to put any 13 year old off the very idea of sex.

Topic! Yeah, you're probably right about the makers setting them in the present. Which really won't work, because parts of them were already dated when I read them in the mid-80s (particularly Margaret's enormous belted sanitary towels, which must really mystify today's ten year olds).


crumpet2
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 08:29 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Bear:
No it's not! It's about scaring the crap out of all its readers who will be convinced that they too have scoliosis and will have to spend years encased in a hideous back brace!
Yeah! [shudder!]


lex
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 10:04 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Off topic- I still can't hear the name "Ralph" without thinking of "Forever".

(shudder)


goovie
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 11:24 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Word to Deenie and the scoliosis scare. I still remember the scoliosis screening we had in seventh grade, and how I kept thinking of Deenie the whole time.

I wonder if the Disneyfication of those books is going to be as painful as the Nickelodeonification of Harriet the Spy a few years back?


ken_m
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 05:25 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by FishDreamer:
I found this casting decision for The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe today. I don't know how I feel about this. She's tall enough, and I think has the acting ability, but The White Witch is supposed to be big and imposing, and I just don't see it. Someone more like Lucy Lawless, or anyone I see more as an ass-kicker rather than beautiful and wily but physically fragile.
I know how I feel about it. The White Witch is Angelica Huston. I don't care who they cast, that's who she is in my head, and that's who she'll always be.


viva
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 05:35 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

It always seemed like the White Witch was gripping someone strongly by the arm/ear or swiping at them... Nicole just doesn't seem strong enough to take a whack at someone. She's too skinny.

Ekaterina
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 06:11 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Oh my gosh. Disney....it just takes books, really good books, and it kills them. It's like they enjoy seeing the book die a very, very painful death within the movie. I'll never forgive them for 'A Ring of Endless Light' a year or two ago.

The thing I'm worried about is if they set the Narnia books in the present day. Because The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - it's really about the children's war, but it is set within the very scary situation of WWII, and how Christianity is battling against the forces of evil. And although some may object to the Christian context, they are very Christian books, and to completely secularlize the books would be, in my opinion, taking away part of their integral meaning.


Bear
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 06:21 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
it's really about the children's war, but it is set within the very scary situation of WWII, and how Christianity is battling against the forces of evil
That's interesting - I've never thought of the book's central conflict as related to the war at all. But then, the only reference to the war is in the first paragraph, and somehow I read it about a million times before I noticed that line (don't ask me how). To be honest, I still don't think WWII is a huge part of the book - I've always thought of it as a simple device to get the children in a strange house in the country - and I don't think to change the time would be to automatically secularise them. But I don't think the time should be changed anyway, because that would just be stupid and unfaithful to the books. I am ridiculously anal about any adaptations of books I love, and I love few books more than I love this one, so if they change anything I'd be enraged.

And, word on Angelica Houston - how could I not have thought of her before?


Promethea
(Ching Shih)
03/10/04 09:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

NO, Nicole Kidman is Mrs Coulter, not the White Witch!

Boy, I can't wait for the Disney-tie-in range of Turkish Delight.


xenopi
(Ching Shih)
03/11/04 02:08 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

One of my all-time favorite books is Stephen King's It. I mean, I really love this book, probably more than any Stephen King book has the right to be loved, even more than The Stand. I've never seen the film (was it made for tv?), but last night it came on Sci-Fi and what the hell, it was that or The Craft.

Oh sweet Jesus. Harry Anderson? John Ritter? And was Big Bill, played by John Boy Walton (!), rocking a ponytail? It was so wrong, from start to finish. The Ubiquitous They managed to take one of the more moving and distressing books I read as a kid and turn it into a campy chuckle - the casting was so wrong and the direction almost non-existant.

I demand a do-over! I'd like to see a director with some vision take this one on. I know King's good books are a challenge to film because the strongest parts to capture are the characters' internal voices, but someone could at least give it the old college try. Plus production totally cheaped out on music rights, screwing us on another strong point of the original story.


Mistral
(Ching Shih)
03/11/04 04:54 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Good news about The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe? Maybe we'll get Angelica Huston, after all (I agree she'd be perfect).

Argonaut
(Ching Shih)
03/11/04 05:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Angelica Huston would, of course, be great. But alternatively, I could see Cate Blanchett in the role of the White Witch. And I would love to see her play evil.

Rosa
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
03/11/04 05:59 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Totally agree. But then, Cate Blanchett could play anything and I would probably be okay with it.

Meddie Gorgon
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
03/15/04 12:33 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by StephA:
 Quote:
Originally posted by rh dorsty:
Of course, I avoided the "based on the novel" version of A Prayer For Owen Meany like the plague. No way was I going to watch anyone sully that for me.
There is a Paper Jam article about that, if you're interested, rh dorsty. It lives here: http://www.chicklit.com/paperjam/paperjam17.html .
Dear GOD! You weren't there. I saw Simon Birch with my friend and our moms, a night that sucked anyway. Then my favorite teacher shows me this much-loved copy of A Prayer for Owen Meany a few months later. I couldn't read it. I just couldn't. The movie killed it for me. And I so wished that I could have read it adn have had something more to talk about with my teacher. She was incredible.


Meddie Gorgon
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
03/15/04 12:53 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Difficult Child:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Exxie:
So I have a question regarding Breakfast at Tiffany's, the book vs. the movie. One thing I've heard in passing is that the book's narrator is gay, whereas the same character in the movie is not.
I just finished re-reading the book, and there's nothing explicit that indicates the narrator is gay. I did see some on-line references to this as well, but they all just stated it as a fact. They didn't supply any inkling of where that idea comes from. Perhaps it's just supposed to be inferred from the fact that he and Holly have an intimate, yet platonic, relationship.
Hold the phone! Since when has m/f platonic relationships = homosexuality?
When has that ever been an indicator of that type of inclination?
I am and have been platonic with lots of guy friends. They are definitively not gay. We just have a level of mutual respect and mature relationships.

Is that really how people see things now? Am I that Old School?


Ekaterina_dup1
(Ching Shih)
03/15/04 01:52 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Lest there be any misunderstanding, I don't equate m/f platonic relationships with being gay. Since there is no explicit statement in the text regarding the narrator's sexual orientation, I was simply offering a suggestion as to where that implication may have originated.

Perthelia
(Ching Shih)
03/15/04 02:52 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Here\'s a quick story regarding Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time being optioned for film. Honestly, I just don't see how this whole series can be done.

ken_m
(Ching Shih)
03/15/04 05:36 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Perthelia:
Here\'s a quick story regarding Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time being optioned for film. Honestly, I just don't see how this whole series can be done.
Yeah, that seems kind of doomed. The best idea I've heard floating around (somebody posted it on rec.arts.sf.written.robert-jordan. I can't source it better than that) was to make each book into one season of a TV series. I think you'd need that sort of scope to do justice to all the stuff that's going on.

Well, that sort of scope and at least eighteen gazillion dollars.


tygrkatt
(Ching Shih)
03/16/04 09:29 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I've thought WOT as a series would be a good idea. While I admit I'd love to see the books on film in some form, I'm also very wary of it being screwed up.

StephA
(Ching Shih)
03/16/04 12:47 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Perthelia:
Here\'s a quick story regarding Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time being optioned for film. Honestly, I just don't see how this whole series can be done.
That's what they said about Lord of the Rings as a live-action movie, too. *g*


lex
(Ching Shih)
03/16/04 03:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Read in today's paper that The Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants will be made into a movie. People involved include Delia Ephron, and someone involved with "Malcolm in the Middle." If they pick the right kids, I think this one could work.

JohnConstantine
(Ching Shih)
03/17/04 02:39 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by StephA:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Perthelia:
Here\'s a quick story regarding Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time being optioned for film. Honestly, I just don't see how this whole series can be done.
That's what they said about Lord of the Rings as a live-action movie, too. *g*
True, but there's actually a great deal more "action" and so on going on in WOT than LotR. The effects quotient would also have to be higher.

here's the other thing: with LotR you can cut some exposition because the story's so widely known. WOT has a much smaller fan base.

I'm betting it doesn't get made.

As for Narnia, I kinda like the idea of Kidman as the White Witch. I mean seriously, she's got "icy" nailed without even trying. Imperious? check. gorgeous? check. I also have a hunch she'd revel in the role, but maybe that's just me.


ken_m
(Ching Shih)
03/17/04 04:19 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by JohnConstantine:
here's the other thing: with LotR you can cut some exposition because the story's so widely known. WOT has a much smaller fan base.

It also has a much larger "anti-fan" base, or whatever we call the very vocal "Jordan's a hack" faction. It can't help when a large chunk of your ideal target audience has no respect for the source material.

And of course, it's not just exposition, either. There's also a lot of "re-exposition" that will have to be done (unless they issue a program to accompany each movie release). "Okay, see that evil woman? She's the same evil woman who tried to kill Mat in that one scene back in Movie I. No, seriously, it's the same woman. Yes, I know she's come up in the world a bit, but, well, she's a darkfriend and, hey why are you looking at me like that?"


majael
(Ching Shih)
03/17/04 04:39 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
It also has a much larger "anti-fan" base, or whatever we call the very vocal "Jordan's a hack" faction. It can't help when a large chunk of your ideal target audience has no respect for the source material.
I guess that would be me. Have I explained my position on these books yet on this site? I may have. The chronology goes like this:

- one Christmas, my sister gives me the first two Wheel of Time books as a present. I read them, but never really get into them and basically forget all about 'em afterwards.
- eventually I try reading them again. I make it through the first book and partway into the second before putting them aside and forgetting about 'em.
- a couple of years later I decide I haven't given them a fair enough chance and read the first book again. After reading it, my evaluation is, "Well, that was pretty stupid." And that is, as they say, that.

I would not watch the movie.


ken_m
(Ching Shih)
03/17/04 05:06 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by majael:
- one Christmas, my sister gives me the first two Wheel of Time books as a present. I read them, but never really get into them and basically forget all about 'em afterwards.
- eventually I try reading them again. I make it through the first book and partway into the second before putting them aside and forgetting about 'em.
- a couple of years later I decide I haven't given them a fair enough chance and read the first book again. After reading it, my evaluation is, "Well, that was pretty stupid." And that is, as they say, that.

I would not watch the movie.
I think this would put you into the non-vocal "Jordan's-a-hack" camp. Yes, it's certainly bad for the movie's chances that people willing to read fantasy *at all* have this "bounce off" reaction (Ms._m was much the same, by the way). To be a vocal anti-fan, in my eyes, means to say things like the following (actually encountered in on-line discussions):

- "Jordan fans are a bunch of brainwashed semi-literates who are unable to appreciate good writing."
- "I think China Mieville would be offended to hear that some of his readers are also Jordan fans."

You get the feeling those people wouldn't just not go to the movie, they would be on the picket line outside it.


lex
(Ching Shih)
03/17/04 09:07 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I haven't read the whole book. I started the first one, but as it used every single cliche in fantasy writing (and was badly written to boot), I didn't finish it.

But on the other hand, I might sit through the movie if it had some good special effects. It just seems like less of a commitment.


CaitlinM
(Ching Shih)
03/18/04 10:30 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I read somewhere that Johnny Depp "is in talks" to star in a film version of The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, which happens to be a selection for the nonfiction book club .

AdanAbbett
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
03/18/04 12:55 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Read in today's paper that The Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants will be made into a movie. People involved include Delia Ephron, and someone involved with "Malcolm in the Middle." If they pick the right kids, I think this one could work.
I believe that Amber Tamblyn from Joan of Arcadia is attached to this project. That alone gives me hope.


sunflow
(Ching Shih)
07/02/04 12:34 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

*bump*

Emily G
(Ching Shih)
07/02/04 12:54 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by ken_m:
China Mieville would be offended to hear that some of his readers are also Jordan fans.
Wait - China Mieville's a guy?


art_geek
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
07/02/04 01:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Emily G:
Wait - China Mieville's a guy?
Yeah! And he has the biggest arms you'll ever see on a SF writer! ;\)


Emily G
(Ching Shih)
07/02/04 01:08 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Crumbs, art_geek, but he does have big arms, doesn't he?! I went googling for 'em. Must be all the typing he does! \:D

Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
07/02/04 02:13 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
*bump*
Thanks, sunflow.


alizarin
(Ching Shih)
07/16/04 08:52 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Are the multitudes of Diana Wynne Jones fans I know we have here aware of the upcoming film version of Howl's Moving Castle by Japanese animation genius Hayao Miyazaki (Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke)?

You can see the trailer (in Japanese) here , it comes out in the Fall in Japan and will probably be released elsewhere in 2005.


lex
(Ching Shih)
07/24/04 10:43 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Just watched Holes today. I'd read and enjoyed the book, and enjoyed the movie too. Louis Sachar, the author, was involved in creating the screen play, and the cast, which included Jon Voigt and Sigourney Weaver, was great. It's been a while since I'd read the book, but if I remember correctly, the story worked in both forms.

Jules21
(Ching Shih)
07/27/04 08:41 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I used to watch this movie ad mauseum, but now can't find a copy of it anywhere to take to college:C. S. Lewis's the Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe". I think it may have been produced by the BBC, but could be wrong.
And someone asked, way, way upthread if the industry's ever made a movie of a Wrinkle in Time". Well, I'm here to tell you, folks, it's finally been done! There was a TV movie of it shown on NBC or Fox a few weeks ago. I hated it, especially the casting of Charles Wallace, but I'm much more partial to "A Swiftly Tilting Planet" than the first Murray book. Sorry, but It scared me too much, and the science fiction/space travel and aliens didn't grab my interest as much as the unicorns and native American and colonial cultures did. Plus, that book was all about Charles wallace, my favorite character, seconded by Meg, of course.


Promethea
(Ching Shih)
07/27/04 09:18 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The DVD of The Lion is on Amazon, Jules.

I'm sort of looking forward to the Howl's Moving Castle film, because it will be so interesting to see a DWJ book filmed, but I'm really not a manga fan so I don't know how I'll like it. Also, while I like it heaps, it's not my favourite of hers. How I'd love them to film Fire And Hemlock.


Elin
(Ching Shih)
07/28/04 09:01 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by alizarin:
Are the multitudes of Diana Wynne Jones fans I know we have here aware of the upcoming film version of Howl's Moving Castle by Japanese animation genius Hayao Miyazaki (Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke)?

You can see the trailer (in Japanese) here , it comes out in the Fall in Japan and will probably be released elsewhere in 2005.
I am! I am!
This is one adaptation which I am sure will be a highly enjoyable movie. For once, I don't think I mind the changes to the book - and I'm sure there will be changes, as Miyazaki probably will want to put his own mark on the book.
But then, I'm even more of a Miyazaki fan than a DWJ fan, and Howl's moving castle, while an excellent book, is not my absolute favourite of her books.
Now, Fire and Hemlock on the other hand...that one I wouldn't want to see filmed. I love it too much. The purist in me couldn't bear it.
Promethea: Miyazaki has written and directed the best animated movie I've ever seen (Spirited Away), and he has also written and drawn the best Japanese comic I've ever read (Nausicäa of the Valley of Wind). In my opinion, he is stupendously good, pure genius.


Promethea
(Ching Shih)
07/28/04 10:58 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I've seen Spirited Away, after being told by many people that despite not liking manga or anime I would be won over, but I'm afraid I wasn't. I just can't get past the silly little super-cute faces and it hurts me a bit to think of Howl and Sophie being drawn that way. I see your point about F&H, though, it would be awful to have it ruined (though ... Hugh Laurie as Tom? Or if he's too old, Matthew MacFadyen? And Romola Garai as Polly, since she did so well in I Capture The Castle?)

Catness
(Ching Shih)
07/28/04 12:34 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

My biggest problem with a lot of anime, and Spirited Away in particular, is the child actors they hire to do the voice work. That little girl who did the voice for Chihiro just shouted all the way through -- which irritated the hell out of me. Loved the movie, hated the music and the kid.

I love Miyazaki's work. It's just beautiful. Salon ran a great piece his work last year.


eanja
(Ching Shih)
07/28/04 08:03 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The English child voice or the Japanese one, Catness? I mostly watch the subtitled original, and I always thought she sounded like a real kid that age would, but maybe I just hang out w/ children who raise their voices more than most.

Promethea, I don't really like anime except Miyazaki, but now I'm going to have to go back and see how his cartoon faces compare to the ones in Disney movies.


Catness
(Ching Shih)
07/28/04 08:24 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The English-speaking child voice actor. We tried going the subtitle route, but I even though I read very quickly, I found I was missing too much of the images, also, I did mention the really irritating music, yes?

It was probably more annoying to me because I do not like children. I especially do not like children that screeeeech every word. So my tolerance for that is extremely low. The screamy-ness of child actors (voice or live action) is a peeve of mine in all genres of film.


amateur
(Ching Shih)
07/28/04 09:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay is dead in the water, according to Michael Chabon, who was writing the screenplay. As much as I adore that book and wish they would make a movie of it, I can't help being the slightest bit pleased by this news because it would make a better mini-series than a theatrical film.

Elin
(Ching Shih)
07/29/04 02:23 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Edit: Don't click on the links. I didn't put them there.
 Quote:
Originally posted by Promethea:
I've seen Spirited Away, after being told by many people that despite not liking manga or anime I would be won over, but I'm afraid I wasn't. I just can't get past the silly little super-cute faces
Silly little super-cute faces? In Spirited Away? Really?
Oh, well. I don't see that at all, but if that's what Miyazaki's style looks like to you, I'm afraid you probably won't like Howl's Moving Castle either (and you should definitely stay away from older Miyazaki movieMy Neighbour Totoro! \:\) ). In fact, I'd say Spirited Away is rather unusual for Miyazaki in that the heroine isn't that cute (in my eyes - she was modelled on a real kid).

 Quote:
and it hurts me a bit to think of Howl and Sophie being drawn that way. I see your point about F&H, though, it would be awful to have it ruined (though ... Hugh Laurie as Tom? Or if he's too old, Matthew MacFadyen? And Romola Garai as Polly, since she did so well in I Capture The Castle?)
I only know Hugh Laurie of those two...one reason I'm not much into casting games is probably that I'm not seeing enough movies to know the actors well and what they're capable of. But I do think that even with all the right actors, the movie may well end up being unsuccesful or at least problematic. (That's how I feel about Return of the King - the actors did a fine job, it was the director and the script-writer I mostly had a beef with. And whoever made the music score.)


CaitlinM
(Ching Shih)
10/25/04 09:26 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I've recently seen, in several magazines, references to a film of Bee Season, starring...Richard Gere and Juliette Binoche. I'm sorry, but Richard Gere for the father is just so wrong. Juliette Binoche could be interesting as the mother. What I'm most interested in, though, is to see what a set designer would do with the mother's room.

FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
11/27/04 03:39 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

*bumping for moonsilk*

Willemiena
(Ching Shih)
11/29/04 07:01 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I realise that everyone probably knows this already, but updating: Tilda Swinton is the White Witch in the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

And, since this thread has been bumped, more about Pride and Prejudice, take two.

Keira Knightley as Lizzie, and Matthew McFadyen as Mr Darcy. Great big no's all round!


SeattleShrew
(Ching Shih)
11/29/04 10:32 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I didn't know, Willemiena, and I think it's a marvelous choice. Tilda Swinton does haughty very well, and she's quite otherworldly looking.

As far as P&P - Keira Knightley does not excite. But it will be interesting to see an Elizabeth who is quite young - as in the novel. May give an interesting spin to the film.


Emily G
(Ching Shih)
12/09/04 04:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by SeattleShrew:
As far as P&P - Keira Knightley does not excite. But it will be interesting to see an Elizabeth who is quite young - as in the novel.
Keira Knightley is not a bad actress, in the right sort of film (Pirates of the Carribean, Dr. Zhivago, Love Actually) but I don't see her adapting to a really good adaptation of P&P. I admit, though, I may be prejudiced (hee) because I love to Colin Firth/Jennifer Ehle one so much. But I just don't think K K has the right sort of acting for early 19th century England.

Speaking of books becoming movies, there was an article on the BBC today about His Dark Materials having all references to God cut from it - they said something about the present climate in America. I think that's disgraceful! And they're doing it because otherwise the film would be "unviable financially"! So what. The books are about religion and belief and anti-religion. You can't just cut that out to make a movie which'll be a box office sort of thing!


Anne Wentworth
(Ching Shih)
12/10/04 01:47 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Oh, Tilda Swinton is an excellent choice. I love her in Orlando. I'm actually getting excited to see that movie now.

I like Keira Knightly, and I think she'll have the right energy/enthusiasm for Elizabeth (the tramping through the mud-- she's so much more active than everyone else) but I don't think she'll convey Lizzie's observer/critiquer role or wit well.


goovie
(Ching Shih)
12/10/04 02:17 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by CaitlinM:
I've recently seen, in several magazines, references to a film of Bee Season, starring...Richard Gere and Juliette Binoche. I'm sorry, but Richard Gere for the father is just so wrong. Juliette Binoche could be interesting as the mother. What I'm most interested in, though, is to see what a set designer would do with the mother's room.
I'm really, really, really afraid of this movie. But it might be worth the admission price if the set designer gets that room right.


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
12/11/04 01:44 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

One of the weirdest book-to-movie transitions I've encountered was Shining Through. I saw the movie first, and it was terrible. For some reason (I think after I finally saw the movie version of Compromising Positions) I read the book. Let me tell you, those moviemakers were amazing. The plot may have been cartoonish and dumb, but it was at least recognizable. Getting an identifiable plot (and set of characters) out of that muddled, crappy novel is a definite achievement.

If anyone needs a Cheaper by the Dozen fix, the original movie is available on DVD, as is the sequel Belles on Their Toes.

Much as I love the Rosalind Russell version, I wish someone would do a really good Auntie Mame. Similarly, I've never seen a Jane Eyre adaptation that made me completely happy. They all seem to have something that works and something that depresses me horribly.

And Kavalier & Clay needs to be an HBO production, not a feature film. But maybe that's just me.


claudine
(Ching Shih)
12/13/04 02:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I liked In the Cut as a book, but the movie was so-so. A lot was changed to make it more suspenseful, and I didn't like Meg Ryan so much, I would've preferred somebody else in that role to bring it more to life.

There was, however, a movie version of Cavedweller with Kyra Sedgwick that looked horrible. I don't know why she was cast as a former rock singer, but it sounded so terrible.


Anne Wentworth
(Ching Shih)
12/17/04 04:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Has it already been posted that Reese Witherspoon's production company is producing the film version of the first Stephanie Plum book? The snippet I read didn't say who would be playing Plum-- but could it be Reese?

I know there are alot of Evanovich fans here. How do you feel about this?


Gil-galad
(Ching Shih)
12/17/04 06:17 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Nonono, Reese is way wrong.Plum should be brunette and very un-perfect, and a lot more sarcastic.Come on, Hollywood...

FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
12/18/04 03:11 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

My first reaction is to agree with you, Gil-galad, but I thought about it. I think Reese Witherspoon would do okay as a brunette, and she's a pretty good actress. I think she could handle the naive underside of the character, but I'm not sure she can morph into a semi-tough talking New Jersey chick.

I can't think of who would fit the part though. How old is Stephanie supposed to be?

And please tell me they won't ruin the concept like they did with the VI Warshawski books. Not even Kathleen Turner could save that movie.


astarial
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
12/18/04 03:43 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Parker Posey, maybe?? She's my girl crush. Love her!! Maggie Gyllandahl (sp?)might be another choice, but she's a bit too young, and I've only ever seen her in a couple of movies.

ETA: I think that Witherspoon would be a horrible choice. I like her, but I think they need to find someone who is known as a good actress, but is not "famous" famous. Did that make sense?
I'm really disappointed in seeing that Tom Cruise is going to be in the War of the Worlds, because he's larger than life now. I can't see the character he's supposed to be playing, I just see him.


FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
12/18/04 04:20 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

It makes sense, astarial. I'm trying to think of someone who's under 25 and has that East Coast hardness vibe, and coming up blank. Maggie Gyllenhall could probably pull it off, but I don't think she's got the right look. I want someone more like Eliza Dushku.

lex
(Ching Shih)
12/18/04 10:22 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

For me, the only person who can play Stephanie PLum is Sandra Bullock.

Crescent Moon
(Ching Shih)
12/18/04 10:38 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Stephanie Plum is in her early 30's isn't she?
I can sort of see Mini Driver in the role (she has the wild hair etc). Does anyone know who will play Ranger and Morelli?


dazey
(Ching Shih)
12/18/04 01:14 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I've always said that I want to see Ricki Lake as Stephanie Plum. Could be because I want to see Ricki Lake in more films altogether, but she fits well, to my mind.

FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
12/18/04 01:24 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Ricki Lake would be great, wouldn't she? She can do the hard and soft thing really well.

Crescent Moon, if she's in her early thirties then Dushku would be too young. I thought she was younger, but I read the book two years ago so could easily be wrong.

And yeah, I do think Sandra Bullock could pull it off. Not what I had in mind, but she could do it. She does that Jersey thing fairly well and has good comedic timing.


carrotbat
(Ching Shih)
12/18/04 06:11 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I always pictured Marisa Tomei as Stephanie. Not sure why.

UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
12/20/04 12:03 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

But I don't see any of those actresses eating so many donuts that they have to unbutton their jeans! Stephanie's not perfect, and she's also not skinny. And she has big hair. Much as I like Sandra Bullock, I'm not sure she can do big hair convincingly.

A few years ago, Juliana Margulies might have been good, IMO.


skwirl
(Ching Shih)
12/20/04 05:01 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

My vote for Stephanie Plum would be Lori Petty who did Tank Girl and was Geena Davis's little sister in A League of Their Own. She's scrappy!

CaitlinM
(Ching Shih)
12/20/04 08:35 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Yeah, but Lori Petty is tiny, and no way can I see her with big hair.

Willemiena
(Ching Shih)
01/07/05 05:13 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

News just out (maybe): Peter Jackson is going to direct a movie version of The Lovely Bones, with Fran Walsh and Philipa Boyens as screenwriters. I haven't yet read the book.

Raye
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
01/07/05 05:29 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I see that I have found some like-minded people on here with regard to the casting for Pride & Prejudice. For me the definitive casting of Darcy and Elizabeth will always be Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth, they had a sizzling chemistry on screen that made the characters even more believeable.

I am very disappointed that someone found it necessary to redo this book, and to cast ex-Spooks alum Matthew MacFadyen (http://www.matthew-macfadyen.co.uk/ ) as Darcy strikes me as the worst kind of mistake, he doesn't come across as sniping and sarcastic with an air of romantic hero at all.


Ludmilla
(Ching Shih)
01/07/05 03:21 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Has anyone seen the 1995 French version of Les Miserables? I confess that I've never read the book (been too intimidated by it, quite frankly), but I found that movie quite remarkable. Rather than being a literal translation of the book, it explores the themes of the book against the backdrop of WWII / Nazi occupation. The movie had one scene in particular that probably rates in my top ten list of most powerful scenes in all of cinema. I'd love to know what you thought of it, if you've read the book and/or seen the film?

GingerCat
(Ching Shih)
01/08/05 10:28 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Peter Jackson is going to direct a movie version of The Lovely Bones, with Fran Walsh and Philipa Boyens as screenwriters.
I think Peter Jackson is a good choice for this. Heavenly Creatures showed he can do a smaller film, about teenage girls, with weird elements, and have it turn out great.

I read this book a couple years ago, and even then I suspected a movie version was inevitable. I pictured Alexis Bledel (from Gilmore Girls) as the main character, and Evan Rachel Wood (from Once and Again and Thirteen) as her younger sister. Now Alexis is probably too old, but I still think Evan could play either part.


Gil-galad
(Ching Shih)
01/09/05 12:53 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I don't know if someone has talked about this before, but I really liked the animated film of The Princess and the Goblin. Oh, and I quite liked A Little Princess. But it was veeeeery different from the book...

UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
01/09/05 02:57 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The movie versions of A Little Princess are always different from the book, aren't they?

I suppose some of the discussion below may be spoilers, although fairly minor; as a result, this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space this is spoiler space


I guess the thinking is that cinematically, the book has the wrong happy ending. (I've only seen the 1939 and 1995 versions; has anyone seen the others?) But I do like the Alfonso Cuaron version--it's beautiful. The one thing I've always wondered; why shift the setting from London to New York? It may have made it more friendly to American audiences, but to make sense, that change would have required the invention of more backstory than the movie provides.


LaSalleUGirl
(Ching Shih)
01/09/05 07:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

UCLAGirl, if you can get your hands on this version , I highly recommend it. It's a BBC miniseries version made in the mid-1980s, and, as I remember, it's very faithful to the book, including the ending (I vaguely remember one odd change towards the end, but not to the main ending). I can remember watching this miniseries as a little kid and feeling so much like I was in the story. There are some special effects that probably look pretty cheesy after 20 years, but other than that, I think it holds up well.

Gil-galad
(Ching Shih)
01/09/05 08:51 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by UCLAgirl:
But I do like the Alfonso Cuaron version--it's beautiful. The one thing I've always wondered; why shift the setting from London to New York?
I agree on both counts; and about the wrong happy ending. I really like the guy who waits on the old man(you know, the indian guy)? That scene with the blowing snow is pretty cheesy, but it gets me every time.


voiceofreason
(Ching Shih)
01/09/05 09:15 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

One reason I see for changing the ending of A Little Princess for film purposes is that the ending in the book is somewhat complicated.

SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS FOR A 100-YEAR-OLD BOOK AND A TEN-YEAR-OLD MOVIE

If I remember correctly (and I'm suddenly realizing it's been probably ten years since I read the book), the father dies of brain fever and despair brought about by being apparently swindled by a dear friend who turns out also to have had brain fever and who didn't actually swindle him; this friend wants to adopt Sara and give her her father's share of the diamond-mine money but can't remember her name or where she went to school. Really, having her father turn out to be alive with amnesia is a lot simpler and easier to explain on film, if somewhat less interesting.

AND THAT IS THE END OF THE SPOILERS

I don't really understand the change to the New York setting, though. I don't mind it, one way or another. But I don't really understand why it's necessary. The change to the WWI setting makes it a lot darker, which is fine with me. But I don't really see what changing it to New York does, besides setting up some questions that never get answered (where did Sara get that American accent, living in India among British people?). I think Cuaron lives or has lived in New York, so maybe he just feels more of a kinship with New York than with London.


tygrkatt
(Ching Shih)
01/13/05 12:20 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The BBC version that LaSalleUgirl linked to did a very good job of getting the ending right, voiceofreason. I honestly can't remember if I've ever read the book, but what you described is what happened, and it wasn't confusing at all. I would recomend that version above all others I've seen, especially the Shirley Temple one, but that could just be because I can't stand her.

JA fan in DC
(Ching Shih)
01/13/05 08:44 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Emily G:
Speaking of books becoming movies, there was an article on the BBC today about His Dark Materials having all references to God cut from it - they said something about the present climate in America. I think that's disgraceful! And they're doing it because otherwise the film would be "unviable financially"! So what. The books are about religion and belief and anti-religion. You can't just cut that out to make a movie which'll be a box office sort of thing! [/QB]
Please, please, please tell me this is not true! That is the essence of the series. I have bought these books for all of my neices and nephews once they "became of age". Yes, I am the same auntie that introduced Harry Potter and Artemis Fowl but there is something about "His Dark Materials" that I always felt transcended the other kid/ya lit offerings. This would be one more occasion where I would be forced to stay away form the box office. The other time being "The Grinch".
(Jim Carrey, are you kidding me? :rolleyes: )


pagopago
(Ching Shih)
01/21/05 12:50 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Chiming in on the "Little Princess" debate - I just hate the tendency for writers/producers/directors to assume it's too difficult to explain death from depression (essentially) but somehow re-writing everything else is simpler?
I liked the 1993 Agniezka Holland version of "The Secret Garden," only had a few quibbles. I thought she got the feeling of the book pretty well, although she rewrote the housekeeper into the role of the doctor. (shrug) The acting was excellent, Mary and Colin especially, and the cinematography was just breathtaking.

I don't know Matthew MacFayden, but I'll have a hard time liking anything other than the Ehle/Firth version. [double swoon]


Gil-galad
(Ching Shih)
01/21/05 04:29 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Please, please, please tell me this is not true! That is the essence of the series. I have bought these books for all of my neices and nephews once they "became of age". Yes, I am the same auntie that introduced Harry Potter and Artemis Fowl but there is something about "His Dark Materials" that I always felt transcended the other kid/ya lit offerings. This would be one more occasion where I would be forced to stay away form the box office. The other time being "The Grinch".
(Jim Carrey, are you kidding me? :rolleyes: )
OH man, I forgot about that until now. Why did you remind me???!!! That was sooooooo bad. Seriously, you cannot _have_ a Grinch movie except the classic. Just give up, Hollywood, the poet wins.


Perthelia
(Ching Shih)
01/22/05 01:23 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I saw a little blurb on the news channel tonight which said that Ron Howard is directing the movie version of The Da Vinci Code and has gotten permission to film on location in the Louvre. I'd go see it just for that. \:\)

Honestly, I think it could make a pretty good movie. As a novel it bites, but as a plot it's extremely filmable.


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
01/23/05 01:36 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I heard that, Perthelia, but I'm disappointed that the star will be (as last I heard) Tom Hanks. Don't get me wrong--I like Tom Hanks a lot. But "Harrison Ford in Harris tweed" he ain't. I just don't see him as Robert Langdon.

Certainly the suspense could be done well cinematically, and I generally like Ron Howard's work (particularly his willingness to switch genres from one movie to another). But I suspect that the aspects of The Da Vinci Code that bugged me (character development, dialogue, basic facts) will linger into the movie version. I'm not ruling it out, but I'm waiting to see how it develops.


Mary Yelland
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
02/15/05 12:53 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Hi...I am new to these boards. My favourite book is probably Vanity Fair. I went to see the film last night with Reese Witherspoon, and I wondered if anyone else had seen it and/or read the book and what they thought?

FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
02/15/05 01:31 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Hi Mary Yelland. We have a whole thread for discussing the movies we've seen lately. It's over here .

There is some discussion there about Vanity Fair, on the 14th page of the thread.

Welcome to Chicklit!


claudine
(Ching Shih)
02/17/05 02:48 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm looking forward to In Her Shoes, just because I liked the book. I'm not crazy about Cameron Diaz playing Maggie, but she fits the character in words if not physically.

Brooke
(Ching Shih)
02/19/05 02:35 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

About a year ago I was working in a bookstore in West Hollywood, where a lot of production companies would buy copies of books they were considering adapting. I got to hear a fair amount of industry gossip, and so I heard about the His Dark Materials thing early. And started freaking out immediately, and vociferously .

I love those books, but they should not be movies. Not even with Peter Jackson in charge, which was the original rumor. The plot of the books concerns a group of heroes who GO TO WAR AGAINST GOD, for Pete's sake. I'm amazed they've largely gone under the radar of the Christian Right, who're so outraged by the presence of (very traditionally moral) magic in Harry Potter. But there's no way a major motion picture wouldn't get noticed. Marketablity is a legitimate concern when you're making a movie...these are very large sums of money you're juggling, to say nothing of hundreds of people's jobs.

But that's a reason not to make the movie, not to cripple the narrative by taking out huge chunks and switching settings and I don't know what-all. I started ranting about all this to all my customers who bought the books...one of whom told me he was actually working on development of the movie. Hee. Um. Oops.

One lesson people in Hollywood need to learn and never do is this: some novels just don't work as movies. A prime example being Jane Eyre, because the thing that makes it work as a novel is Jane's narration...all puritanical but passionate but strictly self-aware but humorous. Without that you've got an overheated plot (which has been so over-imitated there's no way anyone could be surprised by its main twist) and an admittedly interesting Byronic hero who nonetheless has some odd motivations. Yet how many movie versions have there been? You can't have first person narration in a movie without taking the (usually ruinous) path of Voice Over. Oh, and they nearly always make Jane and/or Rochester WAY too pretty.

Speaking of Impossible Adaptations, it looks like the movie version of Neil Gaiman's Sandman series is good and dead (or at least very very far in the back burner). Thanks be to all the Gods.


Promethea
(Ching Shih)
02/23/05 06:52 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Oh dear, oh dear. The new movie version of Five Children And It is good in some ways - Kenneth Branagh is hilarious, the kids are very sweet, Eddie Izzard more or less makes the Psammead work - but I so wish they hadn't changed the plot. There's all this stuff about their father being an WW1 pilot lost in the war and there's a horrid Dudley Dursley-style cousin and the Psammead lives on a magical beach that they find through a - well, not a wardrobe, but some sort of cupboard and the baby doesn't get called the Lamb nor grow up to be an awful young man ...

I don't mind that they changed the wishes - after all, you couldn't really have them dressing up as Red Indians and such - but oh, it's a shame to have to inflict a 'meaningful' storyline and a message and character development and all that on such a lovely, fun book which I remember as being simply marvellous entertainment.

Edited because using 'sort of' three times in one paragraph is too much vagueness.


PrimulaMary
(Ching Shih)
02/23/05 08:27 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Oh, dear, Promethea, and I'd been so looking forward to that film. spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler

No Lamb? Transported forward in time? WHAT IS WRONG WITH THE EDWARDIAN ERA, PRODUCERS?

Gah. They could have used plenty of the wishes -- the siege, the wings, the money, the Lamb growing up (the Lamb, for the love of all things shiny.) I am really worried about seeing this now, since it's one of my favourite books, and the Panther-Lamb relationship is one of the best in kidlit.

Sigh. Heathens.


Promethea
(Ching Shih)
02/23/05 09:27 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

It is actually a perfectly nice film, if you can just put aside the original story. The [spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler]
wings and the money wishes are in it, albeit in different forms. And the performances are really good. As well as Branagh, Zoe Wanamaker, John Sessions and Tara Fitzgerald have nice turns. The children aren't annoying at all.


claudine
(Ching Shih)
02/25/05 10:59 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I was watching Girl, Interrupted last night, and it reminded me of how disappointed I was with the movie. It started out fine, and Angelina Jolie made a good Lisa, but it became more ridiculous later on, turning Susanna into a whiny little priss, Lisa into a heartless mean bitch, and just ruining the story. I should probably be pissed at Winona Ryder for that, since it was her pet project.

SoIAmGlad
(Ching Shih)
03/01/05 12:27 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by graceless:
Nick Hornby's Fever Pitch is going to be made into another movie version. This time it will take place in Boston and will be about a baseball fan.
I just found an imdb entry about this new version of Fever Pitch. I enjoyed the first movie adaptation of Hornby's book--mainly because I enjoy looking at Colin Firth. And, I can stretch to see the logic in Americanizing the story, trading Arsenal for the Red Sox. Still, I just don't think Jimmy Fallon is even in the same league (sorry) as Colin Firth or even John Cusack when it comes to Hornby leading men. Then I read a little more closely and saw that it was the Farelly brothers doing the movie. I think I'll pass.

I'm not a purist when it comes to books into movies, but I like the spirit to be similar. I can't imagine that there's much Hornby in this adaptation at all.


Mara2
(Ching Shih)
03/01/05 09:15 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I don't know if I'm excited or scared about the forthcoming 'Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy'.

I do like the idea of Alan Rickman as the voice of Marvin.


TrudyJ
(Ching Shih)
03/02/05 08:05 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by Mara2:
I don't know if I'm excited or scared about the forthcoming 'Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy'.

I do like the idea of Alan Rickman as the voice of Marvin.
I'm a little worried (based on the trailer) about how they're doing Zaphod's heads, but other than that it looks good.


StephA
(Ching Shih)
03/02/05 09:59 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

My endless wandering on IMDB tells me that The Mistress of Spices by Chitra Divakaruni is being made into a movie. It will star Aishwarya Rai (of many, many things, most recently Bride and Prejudice) and Dylan McDermott.

It's been written and is being directed by Paul Mayeda Berges, husband of Gurinder Chadha of Bend It Like Beckham fame.

This is really encouraging me to move the book up in my To-Be-Read pile!!


StephA
(Ching Shih)
03/16/05 01:06 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

It's not a book being made into a movie, but I thought you might want to know that a movie called Bronte is currently in pre-production.

SeattleShrew
(Ching Shih)
03/16/05 02:48 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Oh dear. Nightmare cast:

Charlotte: Nicole Kidman
Emily: Charlize Theron
Anne: Angelina Jolie


StephA
(Ching Shih)
03/16/05 03:10 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The only person cast so far (according to IMDB) is Lynn Collins (most recently Portia in The Merchant of Venice) as Charlotte.

janice-christina
(Ching Shih)
03/16/05 11:03 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I think Nicole while a good actress is all wrong for Charlotte if she is in the producer's minds. Because, as far as I can remember reading Charlotte was really short like under 5ft and not very physically good looking either. While Nicole is the opposite. Surely whoever plays Charlotte should bear a close (obviously not Identical)resemblance to her.I don't think Charlize or Angelina are right either.
Lucy Collins I have never seen.


Crescent Moon
(Ching Shih)
03/17/05 02:24 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Originally posted by SeattleShrew:
Charlotte: Nicole Kidman
Emily: Charlize Theron
Anne: Angelina Jolie
LOL Reading that I didn't know whether to laugh or cry!

Unfortunately, the link I followed for Lynn Collins didn't have a picture, but it did say she is from Texas which is a little scary - if she does play Charlotte I hope she gets the accent right.

What about Frances O\'Connor ? At least she's English.

ETA: Is it Lynn or Lucy?


StephA
(Ching Shih)
03/17/05 10:53 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

It's Lynn. I'm a dork.

And I wouldn't worry about the accent - I was very surprised to learn she was a) American and b) from Texas when I saw her in The Merchant of Venice.

You can see photos of her here and here .


Fiammetta
(Ching Shih)
03/17/05 10:59 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Lynn Collins . According to her IMDb bio, she's done some stage work and a few movies, not that I've seen her in anything. She has the sort of face that can probably be made up to be stunning or plain.

I'm more concerned about the writer/director. Has anyone seen her first (and only) other work, The War Bride ?


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
03/17/05 12:51 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Has anyone else seen an earlier movie about the Brontes? It was from the 30s or 40s, and unfortunately I can't remember either the title or the names of any of the actors.

An adaptation I have always hated: Daddy Long-Legs. I liked Jean Webster's book (as well as its sequel, Dear Enemy) as a child, and was tremendously disappointed by the way they reworked it into a post-war musical with Leslie Caron and Fred Astaire. Bleah.


ATP
(Ching Shih)
03/17/05 01:31 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I saw The Wedding Date and it was horrible. I generally like Debra Messing, but she is not a great actress outside of her tv show. The title of the book, Asking for Trouble by Elizabeth Young, is far superior to the movie. They aren't even the same. And, I'm sorry but how does Dermot Mulroney get these roles where women are drooling all over him? It's just not plausible to me, he's not all that attractive. First Martha Plimpton, then Julia Roberts, and now Debra Messing!! They completed changed his character(I'm not going to spoil it), and it's not believable.

Now I'm afraid they the studios are going to ruin In Her Shoes and Good in Bed . I love Jennifer Weiner, and I'm not sure a could take a bad adaptation of her novels. Sorry, this really sent me off.


janice-christina
(Ching Shih)
03/17/05 11:46 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

UCLA girl the movie re the Brontes is Devotion and starred Olivia De Havilland (Melanie in GWTW)

ElenaE
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
03/21/05 09:12 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I am like that too....or if a movie is coming out based on a book, I won't see it until I have read the book...then by the time I read it, the movie's on video!

Except The Notebook...I read that ages ago! \:\)


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
03/21/05 09:57 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Thanks, janice-christina! I thought I remembered De Havilland in it, but was thrown by the memory of Joan Fontaine in Jane Eyre. And I couldn't remember the exact title, but knew it was something along those lines. This is definitely the site to come to with these questions!

eanja
(Ching Shih)
05/25/05 08:56 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I have been amused, in the last year or so, to discover that my son (now 10) shows every sign above become as nit-picky about book to movie conversions as I am. Over the summer, a neighbor invited him to see "Because of Winn-Dixie," with her kids, and he flat refused to go, because he'd liked the book when he read it for school. He does want to see the Hitchhiker's movie, but having just read the first two books this past month, is firmly convinced that Marvin looks all wrong, and that they messed up Zaphod's second head.

VegetarianOnHiatus
(Ching Shih)
05/25/05 09:04 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Not to mention Zaphod's third arm, which looks pretty fake to me. Mind you, there were some things I really loved about the Hitchhiker's Guide movie. The Book itself was great, with those 70s-looking animations, which are totally perfect imo.

SoIAmGlad
(Ching Shih)
08/10/05 07:44 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm not a huge fan of Dan Brown or The DaVinci Code, but I don't like the possibility that some of the most important plot points in the book could be changed to make the movie more palatable to a religious audience. Evidently there are rumors that the producers consider it better marketing to water down the religious angles and cast the movie as a thriller. I read the book in an airport over a long series of flight delays, so I have a soft spot for it. I thought the religious plot was the only thing that saved it for me. It sure wasn't the writing!

Here\'s a NYT article about the changes that several religious organizations would like to see in the film. There are major spoilers about the book in that article if you've somehow managed to steer clear of them this long.


Catness
(Ching Shih)
08/10/05 08:41 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
I'm not a huge fan of Dan Brown or The DaVinci Code, but I don't like the possibility that some of the most important plot points in the book could be changed to make the movie more palatable to a religious audience.
Because, of course, the hyper-religious are incapable of simply not going to see films (reading books, watching teevee shows) which might offend their delicate sensibilities. Oh no. They absolutely have to go! And pay good money to the evil Hollywood empire that's forcing them to consume its ungodly products.

These people... these people it's not enough for them to ensure that they won't be "offended" nope, no one else can enjoy anything, no matter what craptacular mind candy it'll be, no they see it as their duty to "protect" the rest of us as well.

This bullshit really pisses me off.


GingerCat
(Ching Shih)
08/11/05 08:37 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Not to mention, the fact that The Da Vinci Code has sold so unbelievably well indicates that there are millions of people out there who aren't bothered by the religious aspects of the book. Why cater to a small group of zealots?

I didn't like The Da Vinci Code and probably wouldn't see the movie, but I still see no point in watering it down until it's just a generic thriller.


viva
(Ching Shih)
09/12/05 05:07 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I saw on IMDB that The Thief Lord has wrapped filming and due to be released next year. One of the message threads for the movie also says that they will starting filming Inkheart next. I'm nervously optimistic, as I always am when books I love are made into movies. ETA: there was also a comment in the IMDB thread that Viggo Mortenson would play Dustfinger in Inkheart, but who knows if that's true.

Perdita
(Ching Shih)
09/13/05 11:49 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I've been looking forward to the adaptation of Deborah Scroggins' Emma's War, which examines the life (and death) of aid-worker-turned-Sudanese-warlord's-wife Emma McCune, who is supposedly going to be played by Nicole Kidman. Unfortunately the IMDB information keeps claiming it's in pre-production, Kidman has vanished from the cast list, and even McCune's family members don't seem to know what's going on.

I suspect the complexities will be reduced to 'colonially-raised British girl seeks Heart of Darkness via a Large Black Man', but it's a fascinating story and I'd love to see it done well.


claudine
(Ching Shih)
09/14/05 12:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I really liked In Her Shoes a lot, but I don't think I'd see the movie. I had my own picture in my head from it, and I don't want to get it confused with the movie or plot changes or anything like that.

I think Dermot Mulroney is cute.


GingerCat
(Ching Shih)
02/07/07 11:10 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

*Bump*

aussie-mum
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
02/09/07 06:37 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I had to find a copy of Schindler's List after seeing the film! I usually prefer to read the books first before seeing the film but sometimes I don't mind 'knowing what the ending is' and usually the book is much better than the film.

GingerCat
(Ching Shih)
04/19/07 08:12 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

This just in: Eric Bana and Rachel McAdams have been cast as the main characters in The Timer Traveler's Wife.

I'm happy about this. I actually really like Rachel McAdams, and Eric Bana seems like a good choice too.


FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
04/19/07 12:51 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Interesting choices. Not at all how I envision Henry and Claire, but at least they both can act.

Erin W
(Ching Shih)
04/20/07 03:54 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I had read way back when the book came out that Jennifer Aniston optioned it, to act opposite her then-husband Brad Pitt.

Stringy
(Ching Shih)
04/21/07 06:26 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Ah, beaten to it! I came here to wonder about the casting of Eric Bana and Rachel McAdams as well. I have a lot of respect for Bana, and I think he'll do a good job. But it's definitely not how I pictured Henry. I can't really picture McAdams, I don't think I've seen many of her movies.

And I'm very grateful that it's not Aniston and Pitt.


deborahAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
04/25/07 09:57 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just read that Julia Stiles is going to do an adaptation of The Bell Jar. I like Julia Stiles enough that my first reaction isn't abject horror, but...I still recall the other film version of The Bell Jar (1970s, with Marilyn Hassett) as a piece of crap, so that (along with my general dislike of film versions of books) makes me not so optimistic about this. It's a tempting book to film, but I don't think it's an easy one. So much of it depends on Esther's internal perceptions that I don't think it lends itself to cinema very well.

I doubt I'll see this...the book's just too important to me.


Erin W
(Ching Shih)
04/26/07 12:11 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

That's going to be interesting. I can see Julia Stiles in the role, and I could see it being done in a watchable way. But I worry that the film will suffer from the same problem I thought Sylvia did: stripping Plath of all of her humor (come on, she must have been a little funny--the first eight chapters or so of The Bell Jar are in some ways hysterical) in favor of showing her as constantly in the deepest depths of depression.

Auroranorth
(Ching Shih)
04/27/07 12:23 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Originally Posted By: Perdita
I've been looking forward to the adaptation of Deborah Scroggins' Emma's War, which examines the life (and death) of aid-worker-turned-Sudanese-warlord's-wife Emma McCune, who is supposedly going to be played by Nicole Kidman. Unfortunately the IMDB information keeps claiming it's in pre-production, Kidman has vanished from the cast list, and even McCune's family members don't seem to know what's going on.

I suspect the complexities will be reduced to 'colonially-raised British girl seeks Heart of Darkness via a Large Black Man', but it's a fascinating story and I'd love to see it done well.


I thought the book was great but cannot see it translating well to movies. As you say, it's a very complex story and it could so easily be turned into bathos or a pat Harlequin romance.

Anyway, I can't see Nicole Kidman in this. Rachel Wiesz might pull it off.


Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
05/21/07 05:40 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The teaser trailers for Persepolis are showing up here and there now. I found these on YouTube. Wow.

LaSalleUGirl
(Ching Shih)
07/19/07 08:10 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

So, as I'm sure you've probably heard ("once...or twice...a day...all summer") The Order of the Phoenix is tops at the box office and the final Harry Potter book is almost here!

We are asking people to confine discussions of the film version of The Order of the Phoenix and especially of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to the Harry Potter spoiler thread , where the posters have done a spectacular job of erring on the side of caution when it comes to spoilers and speculation.

As the book's release date approaches, please continue to exercise that caution and consideration. Remember that some readers won't be able to acquire a copy of the book right away -- using adequate spoiler tags or text prevents them from being accidentally spoiled on the Today's Active Topics page.

We have a newly revised spoiler policy, which includes instructions on using our brand-spanking-new spoiler tags (courtesy of Anne's Friend -- woo!). If for some reason, you can't get those to work for you, copy and paste some of the "spoiler space" text from an earlier post.

Again, many thanks for your cooperation! We really do appreciate it. Happy reading!


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
08/05/07 12:05 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

So tonight as I lurched out of "The Bourne Ultimatum," so nauseated by the filming style that I couldn't watch more than 15 minutes and left after the first hour (seriously, would somebody buy Paul Greengrass a tripod, already?), I was stopped short by a poster for The Seeker: The Dark is Rising.

Now, let me start by saying that Susan Cooper's series was basically my Harry Potter. That is, they were all published by the time I found them, but I was intensely passionate about the characters and the story. So I hope with all my hopes that they don't mess this up. On the plus side, Alexander Ludwig looks like I imagined Will Stanton. And I'm intrigued by the casting of Ian McShane as Merriman Lyon, although McShane seems too young for the role.

But based on the stupid title, I have my doubts.


Sylver
(Ching Shih)
08/05/07 08:37 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

UCLAgirl - definitely don't get your hopes up... I've seen the preview. They've changed a lot... maybe you can find it online, prepare youself a bit?

viva
(Ching Shih)
08/05/07 12:05 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I didn't even recognize the preview for The Dark is Rising when it showed before Order of the Phoenix. After the preview was over, all I could think was "that was The Dark is Rising? Huh?"

On the other hand... the previews for The Golden Compass look pretty damn cool and got me kind of excited for it, even though I'm really nervous that they'll screw it up.


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
08/05/07 12:38 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

After I posted that, I did go online to see what I could find. It looks pretty bad--beyond The Black Cauldron bad, frankly, and considering that I never hear about that little Disney disaster, that's pretty bad.

Erin W
(Ching Shih)
08/05/07 10:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
So tonight as I lurched out of "The Bourne Ultimatum," so nauseated by the filming style that I couldn't watch more than 15 minutes and left after the first hour (seriously, would somebody buy Paul Greengrass a tripod, already?)

I had the same reaction to Greengrass' United 93. I left about halfway through to sit in the lobby and breathe deeply, then managed to go back in and finish it. Maybe Bourne is worth skipping.

On topic, is anybody else mildly disgusted by the commercials for Becoming Jane? Greatest love story ever? Do we really have to take one of the most brilliant single woman writers who ever existed and plump up the influence of one dude whom she didn't even want to marry? For me, the point of Austen's greatness is that her inner life was just richer and more rewarding than her outer life, and that she managed to both harness that and make herself a legend in the process is incredible.

And the worst part is, I know I'm still going to see it. Damn.


liz_isabella1
(Ching Shih)
08/06/07 10:06 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm in the same boat as you Erin W. Becoming Jane looks awful, but I'll be in line to see it anyway. Oh well, at least I can relieve my feelings here. Salon.com has an interesting review of it if you want to compound the agony.

LaSalleUGirl
(Ching Shih)
08/06/07 02:32 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Originally Posted By: Erin W
And the worst part is, I know I'm still going to see it. Damn.


Hee! I have exactly the same problem, which is why I'm sure I'll still see The Dark Is Rising, even though I'll probably be horrified, based on the comments above...


Erin W
(Ching Shih)
08/06/07 06:09 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I combed all the reviews of Becoming Jane from Metacritic. Salon is good; also Richard Schickel from Time seems to feel the way that I do:

"I would rather have seen a movie about a woman gripped by a frustrated passion to create than a frustrated passion for a really cute guy."

And, from The Oregonian: "But if the notion that Austen was more reactive than creative in her writing is troubling, so is the idea that she needed Lefroy to make her into a great writer. "Experience is vital," he tells her. We should be glad this guy never got his paws on Emily Dickinson." Yes, thank you.

Full review


Stringy
(Ching Shih)
08/14/07 06:52 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I saw Becoming Jane, and I would've really enjoyed it if it had been about some chick named Jean Astin. Thank goodness Jane had a man to show her how to *really* write.

I had to explain to my mum that, no, Jane Austen did not attempt to elope with anyone.

But it was well acted and scripted. And I thought there was good chemistry between the leads. I didn't want to like it as much as I did :)


Promethea
(Ching Shih)
08/15/07 06:06 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I think the thing that bugs me most of all in Becoming Jane, weirdly enough, is not the misrepresentation of Jane but of Tom Lefroy, who in later life was a hugely rightwing politician whose big thing was ensuring Irish Catholics didn't get the vote. I know there's a reference in the letters to him having read Tom Jones, but I don't see where out of that they get him being this inspirational figure who encouraged her to follow her dreams and push the boundaries etc.

Also, while it's a good review, I don't agree with the Time reviewer that "in Austen's time spinsterhood was a fate to be strenuously avoided". YES, obviously, it would have made far better economic sense for her to have accepted a marriage proposal. But on the other hand, you look at all of her brothers' wives, who all died young and generally had heaps of children (Edward's wife had ten, if I remember rightly). In her letters, Jane clearly doesn't think much of this prospect of churning out children and wrecking one's health. She feared that her favourite niece would become a "brood mare". I'm not sure if marriage wasn't a fate to be strenuously avoided back then!


weaseltowers
(Gráinne ni Mhaille)
08/19/07 04:43 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I don't know if i can bring myself to watch the film version of 'His Dark Materials'. I read the first one when i was 17 and fell in love with the characters. I have my own images of them in my head and i don't know if i can spoil that!

vitrielle
(Ching Shih)
08/23/07 08:24 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I have no idea how faithful it is to the book, because I'm only on chapter two, but I saw Stardust last night with my boyfriend and we both just HATED it. I thought it would be whimsical and enchanting, but instead felt that while some of the ideas were cool, that it all fell extremely flat. For me, I think it was largely because I found Tristan to be a dullard and not at all charming, which was symptomatic of me hating most of the characters. I spoke with someone who has read the book (albeit a long time ago) and his feeling is that quite a few things (including the ending) were changed.

Hopefully this is one of the common cases of the book being better, because if the book follows the tone of the movie, this light read is going to be fairly dreary for me. It's a shame too, because I was enjoying it (again, only on chapter two) before seeing the film.

Oh, and while the filming style of The Bourne Ultimatum bugged me at first, I got over it because the movie was so amazingly kick ass (literally!).


ken_m
(Ching Shih)
08/23/07 12:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Originally Posted By: weaseltowers
I don't know if i can bring myself to watch the film version of 'His Dark Materials'. I read the first one when i was 17 and fell in love with the characters. I have my own images of them in my head and i don't know if i can spoil that!


I have heard that they took out all the parts about (spoiler protected, just in case) killing God. Since that is what the whole damn series is about, I'm not sure what could be left, really.


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
09/25/07 01:08 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Today's New York Times has an article about Anthony Minghella's adaptation of The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith. I've linked to the IMDB page, since the NYT requires registration. Minghella thinks it may wind up on PBS or a cable channel; he doubts that it would meet the tastes of movie audiences.

I read the book recently and fell in love with it. And Idris Elba is in it (his role hasn't yet been identified by IMDB), so there's another point in it's favor.


VegetarianOnHiatus
(Ching Shih)
09/25/07 01:43 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

vitrielle, I was pretty meh about the book version of Stardust. I thought it was totally predictable and I knew what was going to happen within the first two chapters. The movie was at least pretty to look at. I don't love Claire Danes but I thought De Niro did a good job. Mind you, I read the book long enough ago to not remember what they changed and what they left in, but I think the movie was actually better.

I don't hate most of what Gaiman's written either - I love The Sandman and very much enjoyed Anansi Boys, American Gods, and Neverwhere. But not Stardust.


Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
10/31/07 09:07 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

It looks like Twilight by Stephenie Meyer may be made into a movie soon.

Georgina
(Ching Shih)
11/28/07 08:47 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm surprised this hasn't been mentioned yet given how much previous conversation there's been on this site about the His Dark Materials series. At any rate, the movie is set for release December 7, 07.

The Golden Compass

The website is certainly pretty enough and you can discover what your own personal daemon is. But what the movie does with the books is anyone's guess. I found that the first book at times read like a screenplay, and it strikes me as the story has all sorts room for great visuals. I dunno. I wasn't really a fan of the books, but I know that a number of people here speak highly of them.


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
11/28/07 09:44 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I very much enjoyed The Golden Compass, but my enchantment declined thereafter until I was just finishing The Amber Spyglass to finish it. I'm not sure a trilogy was a long enough series to do what Pullman wanted--much of The Amber Spyglass felt rushed, as though he tried to cram too much into the book. But I think that The Golden Compass is the most adaptable of the books, and the previews look good to me. UCLAhusband, who has read none of the books, is very enthusiastic about the movie.

viva
(Ching Shih)
11/28/07 06:06 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Cool. I have a tiger daemon.

I'm very nervous about these movies. I want them to be awesome and do well so they make the entire trilogy, and I want to love the entire thing as much as I did the Lord of the Rings movies. Probably setting my expectations a tad high, eh?


Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
12/05/07 12:26 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Georgina, most of the posts about The Golden Compass movie are in the "when good books become bad movies" thread, sadly. Not that I have no faith in the filmmakers, but -- actually, yes, I pretty much have little faith that the movie will reflect the philosophical and spiritual underpinnings of the books. But I am excited about the first movie; strong young female protagonist, beautiful visuals, and perfect casting of Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig as the adult leads. My expectations are low; I just want something genre-good and pretty.

On the other hand, I'm dreading the movie version of Ian McEwan's Atonement. I think the lead roles (Keira Knightley and James McAvoy) are dreadfully miscast, and while the reviews have been good, the movie seems to be a very English Patient-type movie. McEwan's novel is so much more than that!

In my perfect world, the roles would be played by a young (mid-20s) version of Kate Winslet and Daniel Craig.


Erin W
(Ching Shih)
12/05/07 10:52 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm really eager to see Atonement, though I actually haven't read the book yet, and Keira Knightley and James McAvoy seem to be hot tickets right now. Without being too spoilery, if you can, what makes them wrong for the parts?

Exxie
(Ching Shih)
12/06/07 01:28 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Lady Agnew, I actually saw a commercial for Atonement that called it, "The greatest love story since The English Patient." I was agahst because the love story is essentially secondary to the main narrative. It's a big part of the book, sure, but it's not the main focus. I feel pretty certain the movie's gotten it all wrong.

Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
12/07/07 12:12 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The New York Times has this to say about Atonement:
 Quote:
“Atonement” is, instead, an almost classical example of how pointless, how diminishing, the transmutation of literature into film can be.


Here's their review.


LaSalleUGirl
(Ching Shih)
12/07/07 01:09 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Ooh, harsh. I'm going to see The Golden Compass tonight. I'm hoping against hope that it's worth it.

Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
12/08/07 08:14 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Without being too spoilery, if you can, what makes them wrong for the parts?

This isn't too spoilery because I'll just go into broad strokes of the characterization.

In the book, Cecilia Tallis is pretty but not beautiful, smart but not academically motivated (her intelligence is restless and itchy) and very strong-willed. She's also effortlessly upper-class English. I'm not a huge fan of Keira Knightley, and I can't see her playing Cecilia as she should be; Kate Winslet in her early twenties is my ideal.

James McAvoy is even more mis-cast. Robbie grew up lower-class, but was educated at Oxbridge and is whip-smart. I can see McAvoy portray that effortlessly. What trips him up is that he has to have a certain... sexual brutishness and animal nature that McAvoy doesn't possess. At all. Robbie does things in the book that I can's see the actor doing, ever. Let's just say, if Robbie were the kind of character that is boyish, charming and sweet: McAvoy perfect. Picture a young and swaggering Daniel Craig as what the character should be like, and you can imagine the difference.

Can you tell I've thought about this too much?

LaSalleUGirl, hope you post a review of the movie. I'm not going to see it till next weekend and I'm gathering all the reviews, word of mouth and beyond, I can.


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
12/08/07 10:14 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I don't have a lot of interest in the movie, but I do now want to read the book! And not to worry, Lady Agnew. I've spent far too much time mentally casting a movie of Elwyth Thane's Dawn's Early Light. If I could get the actors I have in mind to be the right ages all at the same time (and find Tibby--Tibby eludes me), I think it would be a winner.

alizarin
(Ching Shih)
12/09/07 06:28 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

LaSalleUGirl, did you like The Golden Compass? I was much more pleased with it than I expected to be, until they lopped off the entire ending at which point I pretty much pitched a fit and had to be consoled with beer. But Dakota Blue Richards was perfect as Lyra and the whole movie looked lovely.

Also, judging by the previews they are making movies with bad CGI out of every children's book ever, sigh.


LaSalleUGirl
(Ching Shih)
12/09/07 09:04 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

alizarin, I did like The Golden Compass, although I was annoyed that they put the bear fight before the liberation of Bolvangar and changed Iofur Raknussen's name to Ragnur Sturlussen for absolutely no reason. I read a lengthy article about the director earlier this week, and he mentioned the ending of the film. Basically, he wants to open The Subtle Knife with the lopped-off ending. So, we'll get to see it eventually. (I'm assuming that since TGC is #1 at the box office that we'll actually get TSK.)

UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
12/09/07 09:27 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

On the other hand, LaSalleUGirl, I thought both of those changes were for the better.

Erin W
(Ching Shih)
12/10/07 10:39 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Lady Agnew, thanks for the Atonement info. I've read some reviews of the film as well, and I think I'm getting the idea. It's like when I get angry with movie versions of Jane Eyre that ignore the (in my opinion) primary plot of Jane gaining her independence in favor of the more cinematic love story.

I've got to argue, though, that James McAvoy can only play sweet. I don't think I've actually seen him play sweet. I think of him as a charming sleaze, with an overabundance of swagger. Have you seen The Last King of Scotland?


vitrielle
(Ching Shih)
12/12/07 09:40 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Originally Posted By: LaSalleUGirl
(I'm assuming that since TGC is #1 at the box office that we'll actually get TSK.)


Interesting, because when my boyfriend and I went to see TGC on Saturday night, there were maybe about 6 other people in the theater, so I thought it might be doing horribly. Then again, we live in the South, so perhaps there's less of an audience here for anything potentially controversial.

Anyway, we liked the movie well enough. I haven't read the book in well over 3 years, so I couldn't remember all that much of the plot, which I think actually heightened my enjoyment. We were both flabbergasted with the truncated ending, but so long as they're not just going to take it out of the movie series completely, then I suppose that's ok. We shall see!


Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
12/15/07 05:53 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I've got to argue, though, that James McAvoy can only play sweet. I don't think I've actually seen him play sweet. I think of him as a charming sleaze, with an overabundance of swagger.

That is true; I've only seen him play sweet -- and possibly that's just the overwhelming vibe I get off him. As someone who's harmless; could very well be my own perception of him.

As it is, the movie is getting great reviews, has racked up 7 Golden Globe nominations (I think 7?) and is probably very good on its own terms. I just don't think, from what I've read and my own ideas about the book, it's a true interpretation of the movie. And that makes me really reluctant to see it.


Mistral
(Ching Shih)
12/15/07 11:54 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I hope some of you guys in the UK are planning to watch the new adaptation of Noel Streatfeild's Ballet Shoes the day after Christmas and can report back how it is. I somehow can't see Emma Watson as Pauline, but I know I'd watch it, anyway, if I could. What's up with only showing it over there?

UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
12/15/07 08:19 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Here's hoping A&E or the like will pick up the Ballet Shoes production!

Promethea
(Ching Shih)
12/16/07 08:46 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I've seen it already and it is FANTASTIC. I enjoyed it more than anything in ages. I loved the book as a child but hadn't read it since, but it all came rushing back (Ooh, this is the bit where Pauline can't say "I will"! This is the bit where Petrova can't say "And I"! etc) There is a new subplot about the adults, which I thought was perfectly done. Great performances & casting, it's a real treat. I was surprised by how good Emma Watson was, never much cared for her as Hermione but somehow the blonde look made me forget her other role.

The adaptation is by Heidi Thomas, who also did Cranford (which is also terrific) and the film version of I Capture The Castle. I think she's my new favourite adapter and would love her to do more.


Mistral
(Ching Shih)
12/16/07 03:08 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Okay, now I'm *really* jealous. I'm with UCLAgirl - A&E better play this! Or it comes out on DVD in the US, or *something*.

AlchemyGirl
(Ching Shih)
01/14/08 03:40 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just watched the "Masterpiece Theatre" version of Jane Austen's Persuasion last night. It did a lot of things right -- the settings, the costuming, and most of the casting -- but I couldn't enjoy it because I thought the casting and portrayal of Anne (the main character) was a disaster.

In the book, Anne is elegant, warm, and caring -- a person others are drawn to and rely on, even though her prospects for marriage seem distant because of her age. In the new "Masterpiece Theatre" version, though, Anne is portrayed as horribly awkward, gloomy, and miserable. The actress playing her was practically twitching with discomfort in any scene that required her to speak to the other characters. I'm sure this was a deliberate choice, an attempt to portray Anne as shy and sad, but she came off as rather pathetic.

I also wasn't impressed by some of the choices they made with the script -- most notably, they moved a key speech from the end of the book to midway through the movie, ruining one of the book's most moving moments. Sigh. I had such high hopes for it too! I love the 1995 Persuasion adaptation, but this one missed the mark.


essay
(Ching Shih)
01/15/08 12:14 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I saw it too, and though I agree it didn't really compare with the 1995 version, I enjoyed it. I think my main feeling was that it was bit too compressed. I didn't mind the difference in tone, as I think the book can sustain this interpretation as well, where Anne's desperation is a little more apparent.

I think what came across more effectively here than in the movie, oddly, was Anne's own "guilt" in the matter, if that's quite the right term. I felt that the theme of persuasion was accented more strongly, and that Wentworth came across differently as a result. Oddly, it makes Anne's character less passive, because he finds fault with her for being swayed, and at least the way I saw it, she acknowledges that guilt. It is unfair to hold her to it, given her situation, but there is a sense in which, unless she can own having been swayed against her own good judgement, which is far superior to anyone else's in the story, she can not fully become an adult.

Anyway, I was reminded again of Austen's greatness, which can hold it's own against any number of interpretations, whether lesser or not.


TraceyB
(Ching Shih)
01/15/08 09:00 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I watched the new Persuasion on Masterpiece Theater, too, and had several problems with it. I didn't like how Anne was portrayed, either - she's not supposed to be a beauty, but shouldn't be actively unattractive. And the running around Bath was ridiculous (one of the posters on Television Without Pity referred to it as the 1815 Bath Marathon).

And may I make a demand of anyone who is considering making a movie out of any of Jane Austen's works? Cut it out with the kissing in the street! The 1995 version did it, too, and I hate it. Not appropriate.


essay
(Ching Shih)
01/16/08 02:29 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I agree that the kissing on the street seemed anachronistic. But I still don't have the same problem with the casting and rendering of the character that everyone else seems to. I also think that the running around Bath was within the bounds of artistic license, and in keeping with making this Anne more desperate than other portrayals. Just my take.

swimmyfish
(Ching Shih)
01/19/08 05:31 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I caught just a bit of Persuasion earlier this afternoon, and to me, there were just far too many times when Anne looked directly into the camera, like when she was writing in her diary. I know that has nothing to do with the adaptation of the story to film, but it seemed a little too, I don't know, 'self-aware' for me. It was like the story stopped in those moments, and was replaced by a big sign that said 'You are watching a movie!'

UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
01/21/08 02:06 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I thought the Northanger Abbey adaptation was much better than the production of Persuasion. I haven't read NA in quite a while, but based on my recollection, this production really captured the spirit of the book (Austen's most obviously funny, IMO) and presented characters who hit all the right notes.

AlchemyGirl
(Ching Shih)
01/21/08 01:13 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I caught the last hour or so of Northanger Abbey, UCLAgirl, and I really liked it as well! I'm definitely going to give the other adaptations a shot despite how I felt about Persuasion.

Since we've got Austen fans on this thread -- has anyone else seen the Frances O'Connor adaptation of Mansfield Park? I know it's sort of infamous for taking lots of artistic license with the novel, but I think it's a great film and I really enjoy the movie's version of Fanny Price. Which seems odd to me because I had such a strong reaction to even mild deviations from Austen's original Anne Elliot. I think it's because I liked Persuasion so much better than Mansfield Park -- I didn't mind a little artistic license if it made Fanny a more interesting and less passive character. But mess with Anne and Captain Wentworth and I get upset!


liz_isabella1
(Ching Shih)
01/22/08 03:58 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

AlchemyGirl, I'll out myself as having enjoyed that version of Mansfield Park as well. Fances O'Connor apparently decided to make Fanny more Jane-like and I enjoyed the effect. I don't know if that's because of all Austen's characters I found Fanny the hardest to like. She's just...so...good.

I'm usually also a bit puritanical when it comes to adaptations, but that one really works for me. The Billie Piper made for tv version? Hated it. But that could be the Billie Piper effect.


TraceyB
(Ching Shih)
01/22/08 09:45 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
Fances O'Connor apparently decided to make Fanny more Jane-like and I enjoyed the effect.

I could understand what O'Connor was doing in that movie, but I'm still not sure I like it. I didn't get all spun up, though (like I did with the recent tv version of Persuasion), possibly because MP is my least favorite of the novels.

I like the new Northanger Abbey a lot. It caught the humor of the book, and the cast was excellent. The bits with Catherine's young siblings were very cute and funny, as was Henry's "small talk" while he danced with Catherine. I had some minor quibbles - they overdid the bit when Henry finds out what Catherine has assumed about his mother's death (he pretty much forgave her instantly in the book), and Isabella would not have jumped into bed with Captain Tilney (she's too shrewd for that) - but overall, it was a good adaptation.


voiceofreason
(Ching Shih)
01/22/08 04:36 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I loathed the new Persuasion adaptation. They robbed Anne of all her good qualities! And the pacing seemed weird. I went in the kitchen to make a sandwich just after the Musgrove sisters were introduced and when I came back Louisa Musgrove was out cold! (Maybe the sandwich took longer to make than I thought it was going to.)

essay
(Ching Shih)
01/23/08 11:19 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

My television station cut out about 2/3rds of the way through the Northanger Abbey on Sunday, which seemed about par for the course with this local PBS affiliate. But what I did see I liked very much.

GingerCat
(Ching Shih)
02/03/08 12:08 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm a little unusual in this regard, I guess--I've only read one Austen novel so far, Emma, and wasn't that crazy about it (sorry), but I always seem to love film adaptations of the books and own several on DVD. So this Masterpiece Theater series is right up my alley.

I did like Persuasion, possibly because I thought Rupert Penry-Jones was ridiculously good-looking, and I enjoyed Northanger Abbey as well. I didn't like Mansfield Park much at all, which surprised me because I did really enjoy the Frances O'Connor version. But, to me, Austen adaptations are like pizza--even when they're bad, they're still pretty good! :)

Tonight's installment, Miss Austen Regrets, sounds intriguing. But I guess I'll skip the Pride and Prejudice and Emma adaptations I've already seen, and come back for the new Sense and Sensibility.


FishDreamerAdministrator
(Ching Shih)
02/04/08 05:06 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Originally Posted By: liz_isabella1
Fances O'Connor apparently decided to make Fanny more Jane-like and I enjoyed the effect.


Maybe this should be obvious, but Jane who? Jane Austen? My mind immediately said Jane Eyre, but that's a different author. Or did I miss the reference entirely?

I studied Mansfield Park for A levels, but haven't ever seen a film adaptation.

ETA - whoops, lost a close tag somehow.


AlchemyGirl
(Ching Shih)
02/04/08 09:38 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Yep, it's Jane Austen. The Frances O'Connor version incorporated some of Austen's juvenile writings (like her History of England) into the script and attributed them to Fanny. It sounds nuts, I know, but I really do love that movie!

viva
(Ching Shih)
05/01/08 02:29 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just saw the ad last night (on <cough> America's Next Top Model <cough>) for The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian. There weren't many plot details in the ad, except for the train station scene at the beginning of the book, but yeah, I'm excited. Due in "summer" according to the ad.

Erin W
(Ching Shih)
05/01/08 09:43 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I saw the whole trailer (before <cough> Baby Mama <cough>). Looks intense!

UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
03/03/09 01:23 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Apparently Keira Knightley is going to star in the adaptation of Never Let Me Go. I was very ambivalent about the book, and I don't like Keira Knightley, so I'll pass on this.

Other thoughts?


StephA
(Ching Shih)
03/04/09 11:48 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I haven't read Never Let Me Go, and although I read the story about Keira starring in the film, and the summary of the plot, I hadn't connected it to the Booker Prize-nominated novel by Kazuo Ishiguro until just now. Hmmmm.



In other books-to-movie news, Julie and Julia: 365 days, 524 recipes, 1 tiny apartment kitchen by Julie Powell is being made into a movie with Amy Adams as Julie Powell and Meryl Streep as Julia Child, written and directed by Nora Ephron... which I think sounds kind of awesome.

I didn't like Julie the narrator, but I might like her better if she's played by Amy Adams!


StephA
(Ching Shih)
08/06/09 10:03 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just found out that Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary is being made into a movie called Ramona and Beezus.

So says IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0493949/

I am ... dubious.


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
08/06/09 03:57 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
I just found out that Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary is being made into a movie called Ramona and Beezus.


Oh. Dear.

Also, that name change is bad. I know that Ramona really is the protagonist (actually it's been decades since I read that particular book, but she is in general), but the new title has a terrible rhythm.

I have never pictured Ramona as a blonde.


LaSalleUGirl
(Ching Shih)
08/06/09 05:57 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
I have never pictured Ramona as a blonde.


Or so...perky. I mean, Ramona's a bundle of energy, obviously, but still...


StephA
(Ching Shih)
08/16/09 12:38 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

While seeing Julie and Julia yesterday, I saw the trailer for a movie of The Blind Side by Michael Lewis. I read this book last month and loved it - Lewis explains (some) football strategy and the evolution of the left tackle and other positions, but he also tells the intense and personal story of one guy - Michael Oher - who had/has the potential to be a great player, but who grew up impovrished and practically homeless in the ghetto of Memphis. He is adopted by a very rich family who help him get some education and try to get him a football scholarship.

Sandra Bullock stars as the woman who takes him under her family's wing.


VegetarianOnHiatus
(Ching Shih)
08/17/09 10:23 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I saw Julie and Julia over the weekend with my mom, and we both enjoyed it greatly. However, I never read the book, so I don't know how it compares. It totally made me want to be more like Julia Child, though, not just in cooking ability but in general as well.

LaSalleUGirl
(Ching Shih)
08/17/09 11:42 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

VoH, I read a review of Julie and Julia that said the reviewer (I forget who is was...) was left wanting more of Julia and less of "whiny Julie Powell." I want to see the movie no matter what, but I'm wondering if you agree with that assessment.

CaitlinM2
()
08/17/09 02:41 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

VoH, you will then want to read Julia Child's memoir My Life in France, on which the Julia portion of the movie was based. It's a fun read.

I haven't read Julie Powell's book, but everyone I know who has read both liked the original blog much better than the book, so I'd look to that first.

LSUG, I haven't seen it yet either, but in the lively discussions about it on my food-centric forum, people have generally agreed with your reviewer. And everyone, including personal acquintances of Julia Child, says Meryl Streep is genius (no surprise there).


VegetarianOnHiatus
(Ching Shih)
08/17/09 03:08 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I had heard about the "whiny Julie Powell," so I ended up liking her more than I thought I would. I thought she was mostly pretty endearing, although it was a little hard to understand why her husband loved her. On the other hand, I think it's harder to make likable someone who's really a person and is a bit obsessive and moody. Also, I think if I were to do a similar project I would behave the way she did. I get the feeling that Julia is the ideal, but Julie is the reality.

CaitlinM2
()
08/17/09 03:33 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just found this interesting piece where Julie Powell talks about her reactions to seeing the fictionalized version of her self and story on screen.

Erin W
(Ching Shih)
08/17/09 04:06 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I was surprised how much I related to the Julie character of Julie and Julia. I'm going through sort of a quarter-life crisis similar to what prompts her to take on the challenge, and I'm no stranger to setting myself up for ridiculous personal challenges. (See, for example, this summer when I watched 100 movies I had never seen before.)

Of course, it would be no stretch of the imagination to call me bitchy, whiny, temperamental, moody, impossible, or any of those other things, so: fair warning.


CaitlinM2
()
03/15/10 02:13 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I am disheartened to report that Stephanie Plum is coming to the big screen, and will be played by Katherine Heigl. Janet Evanovich thinks she'll be great. I...disagree. Besides, I can't imagine any actor could make Ranger as sexy onscreen as he is on the page.

UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
03/15/10 06:26 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I liked Julie and Julia well enough in book form, and then read Cleaving. I will never again buy a book by Julie Powell--I now find her loathsome. However, I probably will see the movie of J&J for the performances.

And beyond the fact that I don't like Katherine Heigl, she's all wrong for Stephanie Plum! Wrong hair, wrong body type--if they want me to believe that Stephanie shares my outsize love for donuts, they should cast someone else!


LaSalleUGirl
(Ching Shih)
03/15/10 07:18 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

UCLAGirl, I've heard enough about Cleaving to find her loathsome even without reading it. Yick. I would definitely encourage watching the movie, though, even if you fast-forward through the Julie parts. (I love Amy Adams dearly, but even she couldn't save those segments.) The trifecta of Meryl Streep, Stanley Tucci, and Jane Lynch is just amazing.

UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
03/15/10 09:40 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

LaSalleUGirl, it wasn't so much what she revealed intentionally as the self-absorbed-but-un-self-aware callousness that was unintentionally revealed. I also got the impression that she desperately wants to be "interesting." Ultimately I decided that she was someone I didn't want to spend any more time with.

LaSalleUGirl
(Ching Shih)
03/15/10 10:22 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The Julie and Julia comments thread over on Tomato Nation agrees with you, UCLAGirl: http://tomatonation.com/?p=4424. The anecdote about running into a fan who mistook her lover for her husband makes my stomach hurt.

UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
03/15/10 10:48 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I think that's the one that hit me hardest, too.

If there had been some reflection in the telling of her various anecdotes, I think I wouldn't have been so infuriated by the book. But the whole thing had a "Hey, this is just me--what's your problem" tone that I couldn't stand.


Georgina
(Ching Shih)
03/15/10 11:11 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Do we have a Julia Powell thread so I can understand a reaction as strong as "loathing" for an author? (I can explain Mario Puzo well, in that respect so I'm curious.) I don't want to derail this thread.

On the Julie and Julia front, I found the movie delightful and Meryl Streep, as ever, amazing. Thank you for the blog link. I'll give that a read.

Edit: Scratch my original question. I followed the book review link from Tomato Nation. Now I fully understand "loathe" without anything further.


Angiv
(Ching Shih)
03/16/10 07:13 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Quote:
I am disheartened to report that Stephanie Plum is coming to the big screen, and will be played by Katherine Heigl. Janet Evanovich thinks she'll be great. I...disagree. Besides, I can't imagine any actor could make Ranger as sexy onscreen as he is on the page.


NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

I think that about covers it.

Except for: Ranger? Meh. I'm all about Joe. Unless they cast Enrique Murciano as Ranger, then Joe won't get a look in.


essay
(Ching Shih)
03/17/10 10:35 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I could see Gary Dourdan from CSI as Ranger--in fact, I think that's who I did see, now that I think about it. I have no idea who could play Stephanie. Actually, maybe Sandra Bullock could do it.

And who could do Lula? Grandma Mazur?


StephA
(Ching Shih)
03/25/10 01:42 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just read that A Wrinkle in Time is going to be made into a movie.

Good article about it here: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2010/03/we-will-wrinkle-again.html

"I also wondered why it’s taken so long for Hollywood executives to tap into this potential goldmine. [...] Perhaps the delay has something to do with the fact that “A Wrinkle in Time” is one of the most frequently banned books."


UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
03/25/10 02:59 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I hope it'll be better than the version they did on TV a few years ago--I just could not get into it.

naomism
(Ching Shih)
03/27/10 10:58 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Never saw the movie. I read Wrinkle as a child and liked it but not enough to pursue more L'Engle at the time. I read it again as an adult and something about the references to Christianity (I'm Jewish) bothered me--I read books that make references to Christianity all the time without turning a hair so I'm not sure why Wrinkle doing it bothered me. (I also re-read the book a few years ago and am just recalling my reactions.)

CaitlinM2
()
03/27/10 11:22 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

 Originally Posted By: essay
I could see Gary Dourdan from CSI as Ranger--in fact, I think that's who I did see, now that I think about it. I have no idea who could play Stephanie. Actually, maybe Sandra Bullock could do it.

And who could do Lula? Grandma Mazur?


I have no real desire for this movie to come to fruition (and apparently it's been in development for ages, originally with Reese Witherspoon attached), but yeah, I think Sandra Bullock could pull off the part of Stephanie better than others. To me, Estelle Getty (Sophia from Golden Girls[/i[) would have been pitch-perfect as Grandma Mazur, but sadly the opportunity is lost since she's no longer with us. Incidentally, imdb tells me that a TV movie of [i]One for the Money was made in 2002, with the typical no-name cast.

I won't be running out to see the film of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, based on the reviews I've read. For one thing, it's two and a half hours, and that kind of story needs to be tightly told on film. For another, even scaled back for film, I don't need to see that kind of sexual violence enacted; it was unpleasant enough to read the graphic scenes. Alert for those considering it: the film contains some details from The Girl Who Played With Fire about Lisbeth's background (presumably to make her actions more comprehensible to the audience), so if you haven't read the second book and don't want to be spoiled, you've been warned.


essay
(Ching Shih)
03/29/10 11:13 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I might see the movie, though I don't really know why. But thanks for the spoiler alert, as I haven't read The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo yet, and would rather come to it without preconceptions.

Yes, Estelle Getty could have done Grandma Mazur pretty well I think.


CaitlinM2
()
03/29/10 11:36 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Wow, I really botched those UBB tags.

Well, someone I know saw The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and she thought it was excellent, and a very well-done adaptation.

An American remake seems sort of inevitable, I think.


liz_isabella1
(Ching Shih)
03/30/10 03:24 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I don't usually fall this way, but I actually preferred the movie to the book. I thought it moved more smoothly as a movie.

StephA
(Ching Shih)
09/13/10 10:32 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

We were talking about the book in another forum, but I thought I'd mention here that We Need to Talk About Kevin is being made into a feature film.

Tilda Swinton will star as Eva and John C. Reilly as Franklin.


essay
(Ching Shih)
09/14/10 09:32 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Terrific actors, but it would be a difficult book to film. Still, I look forward to it!

Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
09/16/10 09:00 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Stephen King's The Dark Tower series is not only being made into a movie trilogy, but also a television series. I'm not very happy about this. Not one little bit.

I never read We Need To Talk About Kevin although I meant to, but I think I'll see the movie because I am fascinated by Tilda Swinton.


Erin W
(Ching Shih)
09/16/10 09:59 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I spent most of this afternoon reading Lynn Barber's An Education. It's a memoir, a short section of which became a really beautiful movie last year with Carey Mulligan. The book is...very different. Kind of cold and cynical. Which is not to say that I'm not enjoying it--Barber is an engaging character, and I'm liking the section of the memoir I'm in now, where she starts her journalism career. But it was definitely surprising. (Fun fact: the memoir was adapted for the screen by Nick Hornby, who apparently provided the nostalgia and warmth.)

Promethea
(Ching Shih)
09/18/10 05:03 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I agree - the book was strange. I had read the original article and I'm not sure why, when the book was commissioned, Barber didn't expand on this part of the story instead of leaving it as it was and writing more chapters about the rest of her life (which I didn't find so interesting). Nick Hornby really did an amazing job of drawing out the themes that were there, almost as if Barber couldn't see them herself.

essay
(Ching Shih)
09/18/10 12:15 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I knew Hornby had been writing a screenplay, but I had no idea it was this movie. Wish I'd seen it while it was in the theater now.

Georgina
(Ching Shih)
09/18/10 02:08 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Barney's Version by Mordecai Richler is currently making the rounds at film festivals -- and picked up distribution at TFF -- starring Dustin Hoffman and Paul Giamattie as the cantankerous Barney Panofsky.

I love, love, love this book. I've read it at least four times. It's the book I've pressed on more people than any other. Here's keeping my fingers crossed they don't ruin it.


StephA
(Ching Shih)
09/23/10 12:25 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Georgina, I was forced to read The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz in high school and hated it so much I never picked up another Mordecai Richler book. But your love for Barney's Version is persuasive!

(There is a mini-review and a teaser-trailer for Barney's Version here if people are interested:
http://arts.nationalpost.com/2010/09/11/...ation-and-more/


CaitlinM2
()
12/31/10 10:35 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

So, not only is One for the Money actually happening, as in already filmed with, yes, Katherine Heigl as Stephanie Plum, it's apparently coming out next summer.

Here's the cast list on imdb.


Angiv
(Ching Shih)
01/10/11 05:54 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I was coming here to post the same thing. I'd forgotten (or blanked out) the casting of Heigl, so went through the whole shock/dismay/anger cycle again. Then I read the rest of it.

Picture googly-eyes of shock here.


Erin W
(Ching Shih)
04/11/11 12:18 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I saw the newest Jane Eyre this weekend. I had low expectations because no Jane Eyre has ever satisfied me (i.e., been as wonderful as the book is). And while I wouldn't go so far as to say the movie is worthy of the book, it is arguably the best adaptation I've ever seen. It's romantic and heart-wrenching and Gothic, and the acting was great from both Mia Wasikowska as Jane and especially Michael Fassbender as Rochester. I would put the recommendation level on high.

UCLAgirl
(Ching Shih)
04/11/11 01:38 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Erin W., that's good to know. I've never felt like the previous adaptions (and I haven't seen the most recent one or two) got it right, and I think it's significant that it's easier to identify them by Rochesters than by Janes! I've heard that this version actually includes the Rivers family--how do they do with Helen Burns? (None of the other adaptations seem to really capture how that experience affected Jane.)

It's not a movie, but I'm enjoying the new HBO adaptation of Mildred Pierce with Kate Winslet. I'm struck by how much I don't remember about the book, which I read just a few years ago--I may need to re-read it, although I've decided in general that I don't particularly care for James M. Cain's writing.


Erin W
(Ching Shih)
04/11/11 10:00 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

The Rivers family are a large part of the story, surprisingly. Helen makes a brief but important appearance and inspires Jane's moral and spiritual side, just like she's supposed to.

I wish I had HBO--I am dying to see Mildred Pierce.


essay
(Ching Shih)
04/12/11 07:14 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I remember liking Elizabeth Taylor's portrayal of Helen Burns.

StephA
(Ching Shih)
01/05/12 11:23 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm very excited to hear that Canadian actress and director Sarah Polley is going to direct the film adaptation of Margaret Atwood's Giller-Prize-winning book, Alias Grace!

http://www.quillandquire.com/blog/index.php/2012/01/04/sarah-polley-to-adapt-atwood-novel/?wt=2

Sarah Polley also adapted and directed Alice Munro’s short story “The Bear Came Over the Mountain” into the movie 'Away From Her'.


CaitlinM2
()
01/24/12 12:46 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Apparently, a movie has been made of Cloud Atlas, directed by Tom Tykwer and the Wachowski siblings. I'm curious to see how they will manage the multiple narratives of the novel and how it will work as an episodic film.

essay
(Ching Shih)
01/24/12 02:06 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

i]Cloud Atlas[/i] as a movie is a difficult but intriguing premise to pull off.

I'm about at the point of resolving not to watch any books made into movies. I'm starting to feel as though I just want the images I created in my head, and not anyone else's.


LaSalleUGirl
(Ching Shih)
01/24/12 08:50 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

All the hullabaloo over the Oscar nominations for Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is making me wonder how much of the critical backlash against the movie is due to a lack of translation between the book and the movie, and how much is due to "It's too soon! I don't care what you say, or what medium it's in, it's too soon!" The latter is a perfectly valid viewpoint, but I have yet to see a review that explicitly acknowledges having read the book, so it's nearly impossible to tell. I've read the book, and quite liked it, although it's a painful and sometimes overly precious read. I'm curious to see how it translates to film -- there are quite a few weird-ass narrative quirks that Foer uses that don't seem like they would work well on film.

CaitlinM2
()
01/26/12 12:41 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

So One for the Money has come to fruition, and is about to open. And it looks as bad as most Katherine Heigl films, judging from the preview. No surprise.

StephA
(Ching Shih)
01/28/12 05:39 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

A friend of mine has been worrying against the One for the Money film adaptation for a while - she saw it and emailed me to say that it wasn't as bad as she expected! She said it took a couple of scenes but that after that, Katherine Heigl as Stephanie Plum really worked for her. So mileage may vary, I guess!!

essay
(Ching Shih)
01/30/12 02:52 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm in a phase where I don't really want to see movies of books. I feel like I want to stick to my own image of things.

Luckily for the film industry, I am not representative of the larger film going public.


Lady Agnew
(Ching Shih)
02/26/12 03:45 AM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Well, I just bought advance tickets for The Hunger Games movie. Will be seeing it opening night with some friends and probably a few hundred fervent fans. I like most of the casting choices and the trailer looked dramatic enough. It helps that I don't have sky-high hopes for the film adaptation, so as long as it doesn't mess up entirely, I'm probably going to be satisfied.

Erin W
(Ching Shih)
03/12/12 02:42 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Ha, I will totally be at The Hunger Games on opening night, too. I don't know; I've never done that before, but I love the book so much, and the trailer was so good. I'm going with a friend, I think we're just going to have fun.

Kivrin
(Ching Shih)
03/13/12 02:52 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I think I'll probably see The Hunger Games, out of curiosity. I'm currently reading Lionel Shriver's We Need To Talk About Kevin for the first time and hoping that the movie is still playing here once I finish the book. Because. Tilda Swinton. Awesome.

CaitlinM2
()
03/13/12 10:47 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I'm trying to keep my expectations in check for The Hunger Games despite being favorably impressed with the trailer, but do plan to see it unless reviews warn me off.

StephA
(Ching Shih)
06/07/13 12:13 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

Is an Outlander TV series really going to happen?

Apparently: http://www.craveonline.com/tv/articles/511217-starz-orders-outlander-to-series


CaitlinM2
()
06/10/14 02:34 PM
Re: Books that Become Movies

I just read that Darren Aronofsky is developing Margaret Atwood's MaddAddam trilogy for HBO. I've learned to keep my expectations lower than low when it comes to adaptations of books I like, so I'll likely just ignore this news.