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#3580 - 01/01/01 02:13 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
Kivrin Moderator
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/01/00
Posts: 4604
Loc: Santa Cruz, CA, USA

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Welcome, harper. You may have to buy a series book to get a different cover for The Talented Mr. Ripley. Like this .
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#3581 - 01/02/01 01:16 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
harper
Ching Shih


Registered: 01/01/01
Posts: 597
Loc: Chicago, Illinois

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thanks kivrin! now that i know i like highsmith and plan to read more of the ripley books, i'll probably have to pick up that collection.

and the list of books to read grows ever longer...

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#3582 - 01/02/01 01:28 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
cynical
Gráinne ni Mhaille


Registered: 09/29/00
Posts: 25
Loc: Philadelphia, PA

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Word harper on Red Dragon. That book still gives me chills.
And Bear, I felt exactly the opposite about High Fidelity[/y]. I found the movie so unbearable that I had to turn it off because I just could not stand my boyfriend's, I mean John Cusak's, performance anymore. Sad but true. I thought all the humor was lost on the adaptation.
I thought [i]Accidental Tourist
was pretty on the money as far as adaptations go.

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#3583 - 01/02/01 02:38 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
pinkvodka
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/08/00
Posts: 249
Loc: Austin

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Deborah, and anyone else who enjoyed Cold Comfort Farm RUN do not walk to the nearest video establishment and get the movie. I've almost reached the point where I can watch it without doing myself physical damage from laughing so hard, but if I'm watching it with someone who's never seen it before then I end up sharing their delight (and sore ribs).
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#3584 - 01/02/01 06:08 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
Aneesa
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Registered: 12/20/00
Posts: 16

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this is a very uncomfortable topic to read/write about for me, probably because there's no solution. if you read the book first, you ruin the movie. if you see the movie first, you ruin the book. i suppose it's better to ruin the movie though.

i get the urge to read the books of movies that i really like (like emma), but i rarely get around to it. i think i'd sound cooler if i gushed over the book rather than the movie. and i hate it when people say things like "did you see [name of movie]?" when they're going to talk about something that applies to both the movie and the book and there's no reason not to refer to the original.

the worst is when books that can't be made into movies are made into movies. i think this is the case with girl, interrupted. the book is made up of lots of very short (under five-page) chapters, describing unrelated scenes--vignettes if you will. also, many of them rely on the fact that they're first-person monologues, because they're more like personal essays than stories and that feeling (of her trying to prove something) did not come off in the movie.

also, granted that i can't remember the book nearly as well as the cartoon and despite the ugly commercialization (affiliation with sprite, etc.), i really liked the new grinch. the only strange part is when you see flashbacks of the grinch as a child. the feeling of the movie seemed very true to the warmth and weirdness of dr. suess, and it was really funny (and made me cry).

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#3585 - 01/02/01 06:49 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
licorice
Ching Shih


Registered: 12/17/00
Posts: 47
Loc: New York - the state, not the ...

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Word (hmmm...just trying it out...what an interesting exclamation...I never get around to using it without embarrassing myself, and I figure this will be no different, so I am explaining the word choice - pun intended- ahead of time) on the Emma book/movie thing. I loathe Jane Austen - I thought I would die half way through Mansfield Park, perhaps by my own hand - and yet I couldn't resist reading Emma after seeing the movie. I've never admitted that before. How embarrassing. If you would do me a favor and keep that from the general public it would be most appreciated.

Anyhow, I never saw the Scarlet Letter with Demi Moore, she bugs me to no end, but in English class we viewed an earlier version of the film (because teachers sure as hell aren't paid to teach ), with which we kept our books open, and followed the majority of the movie word-for-word in our texts. I suppose that’s better than completely butchering a book, but if you are going to make a movie I would like to see at least a little creativity. Oh well.

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#3586 - 01/14/01 09:16 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
Angiv
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/01/00
Posts: 1291
Loc: Scotland

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I tend to try to separate the two in my mind. This is often hard, but I love movies almost as much as I love books, so I don't like to deprive myself of either. Apart from anything else, I love to pick holes in filmed versions.

I do find though, that I'm more likely to forgive a book for being different from a film than vice versa. I saw A Room with a View long before I read the book, and love both, although I now frown at Julian Sands' blondness.

I recently read Sleeping with the Enemy and was amazed at how much of its deeper imagery and message was lost in the film version.

The 39 Steps is infinitely better on film. Meaning Hitchcock's version, not the other grossly inferior ones. The film bears no resemblance to the book other than its title and Hannay's name. This, as anyone who has read Buchan will know, is no bad thing.

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#3587 - 02/17/01 09:43 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
deb
Ching Shih


Registered: 02/17/01
Posts: 54
Loc: CT,USA

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I have problems with movies being made out of books too. I don't know exactly how to explain it, but when I read a book that I feel is well-written, it is as if I know the characters-I can hear their voices, visualize how they are supposed to look and smell. Movies made out of books are almost always a disappointment for me. I loved Little Women (it was the first book I ever read) and hated the movie adaptation. It destroyed what Alcott wrote. The best movie adaptation that I've seen so far-and which has already been mentioned several times here-was the BBC's Pride and Prejudice. On the other hand, the one time I've ever seen the movie version of a book before actually reading the book was with The Cider House Rules and while I found the movie tolerable, I thought the book was practically incoherent.

edited to add that I've spent the last few hours reading old posts and you all know so much more then I do about books it's embarrassing. But it's going to be educational!

[This message has been edited by deb (edited February 17, 2001).]

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#3588 - 02/18/01 06:19 AM Re: Books that Become Movies
Bear
Ching Shih


Registered: 08/28/00
Posts: 1954
Loc: Dublin, Ireland

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God, the BBC just showed an adaptation of Nancy Mitford's Love in a Cold Climate (actually, the TV version was an amalgamation of that novel and Mitford's previous book about the same characters, The Pursuit of Love) and my GOD it was dreadful. They've been two of my favourite books for years (they're very, very funny) and it was physically painful to watch them being butchered on screen. The humour and charm had vanished, and instead it was a prissy costume drama about irritating aristocrats living it up between the wars.

I mean, essentially that is what the books are about, but their considerable charm lies in the gorgeous, bitchy writing, and the appeallingness of the characters, and all that was gone. The actors playing the lead parts were just ridiculously wrong -and this is vile of me, I know, but when there is a character who's meant to be noticably beautiful and charming, why cast a shrill, hatchet-faced women who looks about twenty years older than the character is meant to be? And when there's a character who's meant to be sensible and ordinary looking, why cast a sort of waifish dreamy girl with a ridiculously airy-fairy voice which, her being the narrator, spoils the whole thing? Bah!

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#3589 - 02/18/01 06:21 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
Angiv
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/01/00
Posts: 1291
Loc: Scotland

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Bear - I saw the adaptation as well, and enjoyed it, but I've never read the books. The adaptation made me want to read the books and I've read enough of your posts here to trust your taste in books, so now I want even more to read them.

I have a feeling that this will be like Dalziel & Pascoe where I loved them on TV until I read the books, and now I can't even stand to watch them.

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