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#3590 - 02/20/01 10:22 AM Re: Books that Become Movies
Bear
Ching Shih


Registered: 08/28/00
Posts: 1954
Loc: Dublin, Ireland

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Glad you trust my literary tastes, Angiv - I hope you're not disappointed by Nancy! And they're available in such lovely editions too (I got all mine in the late '80s, and they're not half as nice as the current Penguin editions). Read The Pursuit of Love first - Love in A Cold Climate is sort of a sequel. Be warned, they are terribly, outrageously snobbish, but so, so funny. The younger Radlett sisters are some of my favourite fictional characters ever. (Weirdly enough, the kids in Barbara Trapido's 1998 novel The Travelling Hornblower, are very, very like the wee Radletts - in a good way, though. She was definitely inspired by Mitford.)
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#3591 - 02/20/01 11:09 AM Re: Books that Become Movies
Orlando
Ching Shih


Registered: 10/22/00
Posts: 335
Loc: Australia

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Definitely read the books - they're fantastic and so much better than the TV version. If you like Nancy's books I'd also recommend Hons and Rebels which is Jessica Mitford's autobiography. They were such a bizarre family, with their father being just like Uncle Matthes, child hunts and all.

Despite being such a snob Nancy saw herself as a socialist and the rest of them all had very strange politics - Unity was in love with Hitler, Diana married Oswald Mosley and Jessica helped found the Communist Party of America. One of my favourite scenes in Hons and Rebels is when they show their political loyalties by etching swastikas and hammer and sickles into the sitting room window with their diamond rings!

- edited because I just realised I got the italics wrong!

[This message has been edited by Orlando (edited February 24, 2001).]

[This message has been edited by Orlando (edited February 24, 2001).]

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#3592 - 02/20/01 03:36 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
Bear
Ching Shih


Registered: 08/28/00
Posts: 1954
Loc: Dublin, Ireland

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Oh, Hons and Rebels is the greatest! I love Jessica Mitford. Actually, I found a book of her collected journalism in a second hand bookshop just last week, and I was very happy. The Mitfords really are a fascinating family. The biography of Diana Mosley by Jan Dalley which came out last year is pretty good too, as are Nancy's essays A Talent to Annoy, which I think may be out of print. And I think Nancy's essential leftiness does come out, but she's still snobby in a very ingrained 'U' way - despising people who said 'notepaper' and 'mirror' and so on. Of course, she freely admitted it, so one can't really mind too much.

Okay, that was all very off topic.

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#3593 - 02/25/01 12:51 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
Listen
Gráinne ni Mhaille


Registered: 09/21/00
Posts: 15
Loc: Plymouth, NH, USA

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When I was a kid I saw the excellent animated movie _The Last Unicorn_. Later, I read the book. Now, it may in part be because I read the book second, but I thought the movie was the closest I've ever seen a movie come to a book. The biggest difference I could see was that in the book Schmendrick the magician has a beard, and in the movie he doesn't. It's a beautiful, beautiful book, and if the movie doesn't capture its luminousness, it does follow the story and give a sense of the wonder that pervades the book.

[This message has been edited by Listen (edited February 25, 2001).]
_________________________
Into the spaceship, Granny! - Ursula K. LeGuin

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#3594 - 02/25/01 02:42 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
opheliac
Gráinne ni Mhaille


Registered: 02/25/01
Posts: 4
Loc: OH, USA

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I think the very best movie adaptation I've seen is the BBC version of Pride and Prejudice. I think it was just perfectly cast and the script used so much of the original dialogue that it was as perfect as one can get. (considering that most movie adaptations are wretched.)
But the most disappointing thing I ever saw was the "Anne of Green Gables: The Continuing Story" It was just absolutely ridiculous! The first two movies were slightly off, but still bearable...but this! It made absolutely no sense! There was not a single thing that fit with the novels, and I was so depressed and let down when I saw it!
I've heard that that a tv mini-series of Outlander is in the works. Anybody know anything about that?

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#3595 - 03/05/01 10:33 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
melusina
Gráinne ni Mhaille


Registered: 03/05/01
Posts: 1
Loc: Sydney Australia

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I would much prefer to read the book rather than/before seeing the movie. That said, I always meant to read Vanity Fair and didn't get around to it until after the BBC version aired. I loved both the BBC production and the novel.

My reaction to Possession being made into a movie is mixed. I love this novel, it's my favourite and while I know I won't be able to not see it, it seems it's fairly mangled. Roland Michell, an American?

When I was younger my mother wouldn't let me read Stephen King books or anything else in the horror genre. Once I was at a friend's slumber party and we watched Carrie at 2am (screamed and woke her parents up) and when I got home I told Mum in a "what-are-you-gonna-do-about-it?" kind of way and she just said "well I'd prefer you to see it rather than read it; your own imagination and interpretation is much more powerful to you than someone else's." That's stuck with me. Reading is so much more a personal experience.

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#3596 - 03/12/01 04:06 AM Re: Books that Become Movies
SarahJanet
Ching Shih


Registered: 03/09/01
Posts: 157
Loc: Canada

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I am on the fence when it comes to movie adaptations. On one hand, when it works, it is so fabulous. The Princess Bride is the best example of that in my opinion, as both the book and movie are so wonderful.

However, I do get nervous about it when they try to turn my favourite books into movies. Someone mentioned The Secret of NIMH, which was an absolute travesty while Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH is one of my favourite books.

I also still hold a grudge against Disney for ruining 101 Dalmations. Few people have read the book by Dodie Smith, so that's one of those cases where the Disney version is thought of as the "right" version. Argh.

I'm also a little nervous about the upcoming Harry Potter film, but having seen the trailer for it, I am feeling a little better as it looks like it has the potential to be fantastic.

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#3597 - 04/09/02 08:11 AM Re: Books that Become Movies
graceless
Ching Shih


Registered: 12/23/01
Posts: 574
Loc: Illinois

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I guess this might be the best place to put this, but according to my new issue of Entertainment Weekly with Natalie Portman and Hayden Christenson on the cover, Nick Hornby's Fever Pitch is going to be made into another movie version. This time it will take place in Boston and will be about a baseball fan.
Colin Firth, can you do a Boston accent?

I could be wrong about where I found out, I got the magazine yesterday, and found out yesterday, just can't remember where.
_________________________
"Sometimes I doubt your committment to Sparkle Motion!" - Donnie Darko

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#3598 - 04/09/02 01:45 PM Re: Books that Become Movies
bonster
Ching Shih


Registered: 11/04/01
Posts: 443
Loc: Texas

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I have mixed feelings about this too because it's so hit or miss - good book/bad movie, bad book/good movie, and every combination in between. If it's a book I really like, I'm generally afraid to see the movie as the odds of them getting it right are so slim (soooo glad I didn't see Simon Birch). I think one of the big reasons the BBC version of Pride & Prejudice is so wonderful is that they had 6 hours to tell the story rather than cramming it into 2.

On a related note, I just started reading The House of Mirth, and even though I haven't seen the movie, I can't get Gillian Anderson out of my head and it's really bugging me (but at least she's dressed in period costume and not like Scully...)!

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#3599 - 04/10/02 07:04 AM Re: Books that Become Movies
Luthien
Ching Shih


Registered: 03/08/02
Posts: 76
Loc: Canada

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Books turned into movies are always a shaky issue with me. It can be done very well (Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, Sense and Sensibility are good examples, there are many others), or it can absolutely butcher a wonderful book (Disney's The Black Cauldron and the TV production of The Ballad of Lucy Whipple are the first to come to mind). Actually, as I have been thinking over this topic, I find that I can think of more good film adaptations of books than bad. I usually try to avoid any film that looks like it merely took the title of a book and then changed the entire content, so that might account for it.

In answer to some questions I have noticed floating around in this thread:

"The Princess Bride" is written entirely by William Goldman. S. Morgenstern is just a device to keep the story going and cut down on the necessary plot explication. The whole introduction about his wife and son and his father being from Florin is also ficticious (at least in part) because he does not have a son, just two daughters, and there never was a country called Florin (it's a currency, like its enemy country Guilder). I gathered this information from Goldman's book "Which Lie did I Tell: More Adventures in the Screen Trade", which is a very entertaining read. I wish I had had time to finish it (it was too expensive for me to buy, so I read it in bits at Chapters).

For all the "Wrinkle in Time" fans here, there is going to be a TV mini-series based on the book during May sweeps. I can't remember the network, but I suspect it's NBC as ABC is putting out that "Dinotopia" movie for sweeps. I can't wait, let's hope they don't utterly destroy L'engle's work. I read this in TV Guide's Fall Preview back in September.

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