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#52838 - 12/07/00 10:08 AM Re: Women's publishing on the Internet
Audra Estrones
Gráinne ni Mhaille


Registered: 05/31/00
Posts: 23
Loc: Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia

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 Quote:
The fundemental problem is the perception that men are the default and women are the special other group.


Yes yes a thousand times yes.

And I'm in the same boat as Wing, re: Chickclick. Seeing links to month old "Are You A Good Flirt?" articles on their main page, when I've submitted blurbs for two pieces on Marigold about the Montreal Massacre is more than a tad frustrating.

[This message has been edited by Audra Estrones (edited December 07, 2000).]

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#52839 - 12/07/00 10:30 AM Re: Women's publishing on the Internet
deborah Administrator
Chief Bibliofreak
Ching Shih


Registered: 05/27/00
Posts: 3901
Loc: Funkytown

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How frustrating, Audra. And insulting. Can't there be substantial content offered along with the fluff? Does an interest in mascara automatically mean you don't give a damn about massacres?

I hate the assumption that women and girls are all so one-dimensional. I mean, if I had to choose, I'd pick books over fashion as an interest, and there's no contest; I'd have not a second's hesitation. I just don't see why I have to choose. I don't see why networks trying to appeal to girls and women unnecessarily narrow the field. I don't see why things have to be more or less divided into camps of "fatuous appearance-obsessed ninny" and "dull frumpy geek" (or whatever the exact categories are). Are all these companies staffed by the former type? I doubt it. If it's about the advertising, shouldn't it come down to the disposable income factor? It's never seemed to me that women who don't spend money on makeup necesarily have less money to spend; they just spend it differently.

Well, I'm just ranting here.

I like this quote from Elizabeth Bibesco (1897-1945):

"You don't have to signal a social conscience by looking like a frump. Lace knickers won't hasten the holocaust, you can ban the bomb in feather boa just as well as without, and a mild interest in the length of hemlines doesn't necessarily disqualify you from reading Das Kapital and agreeing with every word."

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#52840 - 12/20/00 10:29 PM Re: Women's publishing on the Internet
Audra Estrones
Gráinne ni Mhaille


Registered: 05/31/00
Posts: 23
Loc: Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia

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That's a GREAT quote! Thanks, deborah.
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#52841 - 02/13/01 07:49 AM Re: Women's publishing on the Internet
Bear
Ching Shih


Registered: 08/28/00
Posts: 1954
Loc: Dublin, Ireland

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Jeus, iVillage and Oxygen are just so increadibly patronising. I recently registered with ivillage to use their recipe finder, and I was pretty appalled at the limited range of the questions they asked to find out your interests. Am I planning a wedding? Buying a car? Having kids? Into shopping non stop? Um, no. Obviously, there's nothing wrong with those questions per se, but it's the ones they didn't ask - are you into music? Or art? Or politics? Or pop culture? - that bothered me.

I mean, it's not like I don't buy make up or pointless girlie products - my mother just came home for a visit from the U.S. (my parents live in D.C.) bearing 70 quid's worth of Origins stuff for me because you can't get it here and I love their shampoo. But I don't want to read about it. I want to buy it, wash my hair with it, and that's it. I want to read about interesting, challenging things, and these major sites don't offer anything like that.

That Salon article is very annoying in its differentiation between 'women' and feminist' sites. And this
 Quote:
the two most popular sites on the network are, unsurprisingly, its most mainstream. There's eCrush, which lets girls send anonymous notes to their dream boys, and Mighty Big TV, an unapologetic daily synopsis of the trashiest TV on the planet.
shows that the article's author just doesn't get it. I mean, come on, there's a huge, huge gulf between crap like eCrush and something as smart and downright hilarious (did that writer actually look at the recaps?) as MBTV.

But I was interested to see that its original founders of supposedly progressive sites have left. I used to really like Chickclick when it began a few years ago - it's how I discovered plenty of my now favourite sites. And now, you're all right- it does focus more on 'relationship' articles, which are downright boring. The odd time there'll be something interesting in the society and politics section, or the 'home and craft' area, but the rest isn't worth reading. And I'm very sorry that the powers that be are ignoring things like Audra's piece on the Montreal killings in favour of more Ask fuckingSabrina. Is the Salon writer right? Is that what women want? Because it's not what I or my friends want, I know that much.

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#52842 - 06/06/01 05:28 PM Re: Women's publishing on the Internet
WriterGirl
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/06/00
Posts: 231
Loc: once Atlanta, GA; now Brooklyn...

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Maybe this is the place to ask: does anyone know what's up with The 11th Hour ? It is (was?) a fantastic site devoted to looking at sci-fi/fantasy/horror books/TV/movies/comics from a female perspective. (Giving ratings for "Strong Chick Factor," etc.) I loved it, but they don't seem to have updated in going on four months now.
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