Page 7 of 8 « First<45678>
Topic Options
#84830 - 11/09/07 07:33 AM Re: Web sites on books and literature [Re: essay]
ClairyH



Registered: 11/05/07
Posts: 11
Loc: United Kingdom

Offline
A blog I love is In The New, you may have heard of it? This lady does one new thing a day - some are great and some are wacky:-

http://jen365.blogspot.com/

Top
#84833 - 11/09/07 09:33 AM Re: Web sites on books and literature [Re: ClairyH]
LaSalleUGirl
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/25/01
Posts: 1895
Loc: Philadelphia, PA, USA

Offline
ClairyH, that site is totally awesome! I think I'll have to add it to my "check-every-day" list. (Chicklit is, of course, the #1 site on that list!)
Top
#84923 - 11/20/07 11:09 AM Re: Web sites on books and literature [Re: LaSalleUGirl]
ClairyH



Registered: 11/05/07
Posts: 11
Loc: United Kingdom

Offline
It does make for an interesting daily read - I am hooked!!
Top
#84935 - 11/22/07 11:59 AM Re: Web sites on books and literature [Re: ClairyH]
ken_m
Ching Shih


Registered: 04/25/02
Posts: 503

Offline
I don't know if this is the right thread for it (it depends on your opinion of the literary value of comic books, I suppose), but I have recently come across:

http://girl-wonder.org/girlsreadcomics/

It is written by a woman who is a serious comic book fan, and who is heartily sick of the portrayal of women in comic books. Her primary weapon is sarcasm, and she is really good at it. On the outside chance that some of you who are comic book fans have not already seen it, I thought I would recommend it to you. It does not seem to have come up in this thread yet.

Top
#87619 - 03/18/09 09:36 PM Re: Web sites on books and literature [Re: ken_m]
Erin W
Ching Shih


Registered: 11/02/06
Posts: 362
Loc: Ohio

Offline
I just discovered that The New Yorker online has a book club now (or, as they call it, a reader’s cooperative). March’s book was Revolutionary Road; April’s is George Orwell’s Down and Out in Paris and London.

It looks like the NY staff post their meditations on the work (what I skimmed seemed very interesting) and anybody who registers can put forth an opinion via comment.

Top
#87621 - 03/20/09 12:08 AM Re: Web sites on books and literature [Re: Erin W]
essay
Ching Shih


Registered: 08/18/01
Posts: 1738

Offline
I'd heard about this, but didn't know they were doing Orwell. I think I even have DaOiLaP here somewhere. One of my dad's favorite books--I really should seize the day...
Top
#89050 - 01/24/10 08:34 PM Re: Web sites on books and literature [Re: essay]
Angiv
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/01/00
Posts: 1291
Loc: Scotland

Offline
This seems like the place to post about this site:

Distributed Proofreaders

They proofread books for Project Gutenberg, and anyone can join in. You do one page at a time, and each book goes through at least 2 and usually 3 proofreads, so you can be sure that you're not going to be solely responsible if a mistake slips through.

I'm absurdly excited, and am enjoying it so much that I have a paranoid fear that everyone else has known about it for ever and they just haven't told me.

I like being able to dart from book to book. Today I've read masses of early 20th century Science Fiction, had lessons on Horse Riding (in French), travelled around Minnesota with a (rather racist) trapper, and learned about the Jewish community in Montreal in the late 18th Century.

Bliss.

Top
#89053 - 01/24/10 09:04 PM Re: Web sites on books and literature [Re: Angiv]
essay
Ching Shih


Registered: 08/18/01
Posts: 1738

Offline
No, not everyone knows about it, Angiv, but I do have a friend who does it, or did. He really liked it. He is a meticulous type--I fear my abilities do not really lie in this direction. I understand the interest in darting around, though.
Top
#89475 - 04/18/10 11:04 PM Re: Web sites on books and literature [Re: essay]
CaitlinM2



Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 457
Loc: San Francisco Bay Area

Offline
My aunt tipped me to two sites devoted to international literature in translation.

Words Without Borders is an online magazine that includes both reviews and short stories, essays, poems, and excerpts.

Here's their mission statement:

 Quote:
Words without Borders translates, publishes, and promotes the finest contemporary international literature. Our publications and programs open doors for readers of English around the world to the multiplicity of viewpoints, richness of experience, and literary perspective on world events offered by writers in other languages. We seek to connect international writers to the general public, to students and educators, and to print and other media and to serve as a primary online location for a global literary conversation.

Every month, on our online magazine, we publish eight to ten new works by international writers. We have published works by Nobel Prize winner J.M.G Le Clézio, Herta Müller, Mahmoud Darwish, Etgar Keret, Per Petterson, Fadhil Al-Azzawi, W.G. Sebald, and Ma Jian, as well as many new and rising international writers. To date we have published well over a thousand pieces from 114 countries and eighty languages.


They also publish print anthologies.

Three Percent is mostly reviews and news/info/commentary. Here's some info about it:

 Quote:
The motivating force behind the website is the view that reading literature from other countries is vital to maintaining a vibrant book culture and to increasing the exchange of ideas among cultures. In this age of globalization, one of the best ways to preserve the uniqueness of cultures is through the translation and appreciation of international literary works. To remain among the world’s best educated readers, English speakers must have access to the world’s great literatures. It is a historical truism and will always remain the case that some of the best books ever written were written in a language other than English.

Unfortunately, only about 3% of all books published in the United States are works in translation. That is why we have chosen the name Three Percent for this site. And that 3% figure includes all books in translation—in terms of literary fiction and poetry, the number is actually closer to 0.7%. While that figure obviously represents more books than any one person could read in a year, it’s hardly an impressive number.

An even greater shame is that only a fraction of the titles that do make their way into English are covered by the mainstream media. So despite the quality of these books, most translations go virtually unnoticed and never find their audience.

The idealistic hope of Three Percent is to help change that—at least a little bit. By bringing readers information about goings-on in the world of international literature, and by providing reviews and samples of books in translation and those that have yet to be translated, we hope to serve as a resource for readers, students, translators, and editors interested in international literature.

Top
#89629 - 05/27/10 03:16 PM Re: Web sites on books and literature [Re: deborah]
Anne's Friend Administrator
Ching Shih


Registered: 10/04/04
Posts: 353
Loc: Cambridge, United Kingdom

Offline
I'm rather excited about this: they're digitising and putting online all of Jane Austen's known fiction manuscripts. How wonderful is that? I'm sure it'll be a boon to those studying her work; personally, I think it's just plain brilliant to be able to see them. You can find the web site here: http://www.janeausten.ac.uk .
Top
Page 7 of 8 « First<45678>


Moderator:  Masha 
Hop to: