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#59439 - 07/24/02 02:42 PM Re: Being a Librarian
Library Girl
Ching Shih


Registered: 01/22/02
Posts: 50
Loc: North Carolina

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There most popular place that rank library programs is the US News and World Report Graduate School Rankings for Library Science You can get the entire rankings list from your public library--it is a special publication. The most recent ranking is from 1999, however, the top schools are almost always Illinois and Chapel Hill- they tend to switch back and forth.

In my opinion, go to the closest, cheapest program you can get into. The admission standards for most schools aren't that bad. Field work, internship and graduate assistant experience that you take advantage of while in school makes much more of an impact than the school you go to.

Bear in mind, though, if you are going to take a distance learning program, you need to be near a research library--you are going to need their print resources, as well as the electronic databases that you can access through your own program.

I am so glad to see Grandefille taking the leap!!!

[This message has been edited by Library Girl (edited July 24, 2002).]

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#59440 - 07/26/02 07:47 AM Re: Being a Librarian
grandefille
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/19/01
Posts: 69
Loc: below the Mason-Dixon polling ...

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~ waves to the wonderful Library Girl ~

That's what convinced me. Although I would dearly love to be on-campus for my MLS (and could get it in much less time), that situation is just not feasible right now. Fortunately, I have three excellent research libraries within 30 minutes of my house (two of which are 10 miles from my office).

Expect me to be asking for advice in the coming months, y'all. Also, coffee.

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#59441 - 07/30/02 09:55 AM Re: Being a Librarian
Guzzigirl
Ching Shih


Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 34
Loc: San Diego

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Haven't posted in a while but wanted to chime in as a friend told me about this thread last night.

I'm a high school librarian at a private K-12 school and I love my job. Here in CA, if you wish to be a public school librarian, you must also possess a CA teaching credential AND a library credential (which is essentially about 9 units short of an MLIS/MLS). I didn't want to do that extra schooling so I decided to finish the MLIS and look for private school and/or community college jobs.

I am definitely an extrovert and a people person. Typical duties for me: I teach classes of kids how to do research, help them find print and electronic resources, purchase materials, coordinate technology for the library (including administering the automated circulation system), conduct teacher in-services, serve on the curriculum and technology committees and serve as faculty advisor to three student clubs. My hours and pay are excellent and I get the whole summer off (unless I want to teacher summer school). The only part of my job that is difficult at any time is disciplining the students -- maybe because I still act like a teenager myself sometimes. Even that isn't so bad -- they really do listen most of the time!

The traditional "shsh-ing" school librarian is going away fast. Now you need to be a savvy technologist, know what's out there in print and online, and be able to teach, talk and promote yourself to all kinds of audiences. There are many jobs -- the older generation are retiring in large numbers.

JaneLouise -- There is a professor at UC Fullerton that I know who teaches archiving. It sounds fascinating to me -- I once looked into the field of motion picture archiving. Look online for professional associations. They can give you information on the field.

Sorry this is long -- I get excited!

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#59442 - 07/31/02 02:42 PM Re: Being a Librarian
SarahJanet
Ching Shih


Registered: 03/09/01
Posts: 157
Loc: Canada

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My mum teaches in the Library School here. If you'd like more information, do drop me an email.

It's something I've often considering doing, and I worked two summers in children's libraries. I loved it. Loved. It. Having a kid come up to you and tell you how much they loved the book that you suggested to them and how much they want another book just like it? Makes the entire job worth it. Sure, there are difficult customers. But the kids who love to read and keep coming back, or the ones who didn't and started to because of the books you gave them...oh, man. It's the best.

Man, I miss that job.

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#59443 - 07/31/02 11:55 PM Re: Being a Librarian
Out of the Night
Gráinne ni Mhaille


Registered: 10/28/01
Posts: 16

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Does anyone have information about programs in Minnesota? As far as I know, St. Catherines is the only college in the state that offers degrees in Library and Information Science.
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#59444 - 08/01/02 08:44 AM Re: Being a Librarian
Library Girl
Ching Shih


Registered: 01/22/02
Posts: 50
Loc: North Carolina

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Out Of the Night
According to the ALA office on accreditation, there are no accredited masters programs in library science in Minnesota. Michigan, Illinois, and Wisconsin seem to be the closest.

Here is the url for the accredited schools: http://www.ala.org/alaorg/oa/lisdir.html

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#59445 - 08/01/02 09:04 AM Re: Being a Librarian
Guzzigirl
Ching Shih


Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 34
Loc: San Diego

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If I'm not mistaken, Iowa may have a program as well.
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#59446 - 08/02/02 03:30 PM Re: Being a Librarian
listersgirl
Ching Shih


Registered: 12/10/00
Posts: 341
Loc: Toronto

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 Quote:
Originally posted by hopper:
If you like books and organizing but not working with people, you can always become a catalog librarian. I think many folks tend to think of "librarian" as synonymous with "reference librarian". Catalogers are quite sought after and usually well-compensated (for librarians).


Yes, there are always jobs for cataloguers because the vast majority of librarians/library students seem to hate it -- I was definitely in the minority with my intention to get a cataloguing position when I finished. Personally I love it. It really appeals to the way my mind works. Also people with science or medical backgrounds are always in great demand as librarians (probably because most of us go in with humanities degrees).

I would definitely encourage people to go out for their MLIS -- it's a really interesting program, you get to meet people from all kinds of backgrounds, and there is a surprisingly wide variety of careers to which it can lead. Plus it seems like there are lots of jobs right now. It's generally not a high paying career, unless you work for a corporation, but it's very rewarding.

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#59447 - 08/03/02 04:46 PM Re: Being a Librarian
celiathepoet
Gráinne ni Mhaille


Registered: 07/01/02
Posts: 4
Loc: Buffalo, New York, USA

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I became a librarian in 1998 asan alternative to being a starving poet. I too love books, and research, but in library school (SUNY Buffalo) I found myself most interested in the internet and so far have done mostly highly techinical digital library development, which I've enjoyed very much and which has given many specialized skills, to the point where I now consult part-time. The MLS can lead you in many directions.

I'd recommend anyone thinking of pursuing a MLS simply take (or sit in on, if the professor allows) an intro to library science class. This will give you a sense of the range of the profession and a taste of the work. Good luck.
_________________________
"I write poetry because I sing when I'm lonesome." Allen Ginsberg

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#59448 - 08/07/02 01:35 PM Re: Being a Librarian
SlyFrances
Gráinne ni Mhaille


Registered: 06/15/01
Posts: 6

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I am beyond thrilled that this topic has been posted. I have been struggling with the idea of "what next" for a few years now (even before being laid off post 9/11) and the idea of a career in Library Science keeps popping up.

Essentially, my struggle stems from wanting to pursue a creative, challenging career while ALSO wanting something that, while not making me filthy rich, will at least allow me to a) choose where I want to live based on what I do (and not vice versa) and b) allow me to keep food on the table and a roof over my head and c) keep me out of the corporate world, if possible.

I had been moving away from the idea of Library Science out of fear that I would be bored out of my skull -- the course catalogue descriptions for The University ot Toronto (where I am moving this winter) do nothing to promote the program. Dull and thick.

Your posts have helped me rethink my situation and I am currently back on track with the idea of visiting the school and trying out a few classes.

I have a few questions:

1) is there anyone who has gone through this program or a similar program and would be willing to talk to me one-on-one?

2) is there a way of combining an MLS with some interesting grad/undergrad classes to add some creative punch to one's concentration (I am thinking mainly of art, language, art history classes, etc.)

I would appreciate some input (and e-mail addresses so as not to take up too much more space on this fabulous forum) if possible.

Thanks a million. Loooooong time lurker, first time poster. I heart Chicklit!



[This message has been edited by SlyFrances (edited August 07, 2002).]

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