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#89432 - 03/31/10 09:39 PM Re: Electronic Reading Devices [Re: viva]
Georgina
Ching Shih


Registered: 05/31/03
Posts: 399
Loc: Alberta, Canada

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Earlier today, for some reason not known to me, I began wondering about the impact of e-readers on the second-hand book market, lending books to friends, and libraries. All of these usual activities aren't an option with an e-reader. I'm not certain I'm keen on that, either.
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#89458 - 04/13/10 11:59 PM Re: Electronic Reading Devices [Re: Georgina]
Georgina
Ching Shih


Registered: 05/31/03
Posts: 399
Loc: Alberta, Canada

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These posts are far enough apart that I think it's okay to write consecutive posts. I now have two friends who have the Sony Touch Screen reader and they are very happy with those. I object to Sony's readers far less because they accept all sorts of e-text formats that allow the owner to purchase their reading material from all sorts of sources. No one's limited to The Sony Store, you can use Google Books and The Gutenberg Project and can purchase your books from B & N and even Chapters in Canada. I like all of that very much.

Now I'm focusing my energies on comparing specs for the various readers. Chapters is introducing its own e-reader called Kobo in May. I've seen one made by Aluratek that is actually technologically more fully loaded than any of the bigger name brands at a more reasonable price. And the accessories (such as an AC adapter) aren't extra. So, now my decision is down to which is the superior machine, and Kindle is entirely out of the race.

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#89460 - 04/15/10 02:41 PM Re: Electronic Reading Devices [Re: Georgina]
CaitlinM2



Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 457
Loc: San Francisco Bay Area

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I found this New York Times editorial piece, "Some Thoughts About E-Reading" an interesting meditation on the value of printed books.
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#89548 - 05/09/10 11:27 PM Re: Electronic Reading Devices [Re: Georgina]
CaitlinM2



Registered: 03/03/09
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So, quite unexpectedly, I have become the owner of a Kindle, which was a birthday gift from my stepmother, who has had one for a year or so and loves it. (Hers was also a gift, and the chief reason she loves it is that she is a book buyer, and it has saved her lots.) Ironically, she gave it to me the same day I posted the above post.

I have had mixed feeling about e-readers for various reasons that are addressed by others in this thread. Were I buying for myself (not something I imagined doing anytime very soon), I probably would have gone with something other than a Kindle and its associated exclusiveness to Amazon. Positives I have picked up from reading here and elsewhere include compactness for travel (unfortunately not something much applicable to me these days), free public domain and other material, and books that aren't available in print in the US. Cons for myself include that I enjoy the tactile experience of printed books, the initial outlay of money (something obviated by my stepmothers gift to me in my case), and the fact that e-books don't have an endless life in the form of borrowing, swapping, reselling, and passing on.

For my own reading purposes, I currently have little disposable income, and I have bought very few books in the past two and a half years, during which I have read almost entirely shelf-sitters, library books and books lent or passed on to me. I have the Kindle, but I still don't have a lot to spend on books, so most of my use of it is likely to be reading free or cheap selections. I've noticed that the e-versions of many books in mass-market paperback cost as much or almost as much as they do new, with discounts in the latter case, and therefore rather more than they do used, too. I'm betting that any books I want to buy because they are beloved or by beloved authors, I am still going to want in paper.

I'm currently reading my first (free) book on the Kindle, and I'm very aware of reading in the electronic format, with the paging forward and back, and the fact that I'm not yet that comfortable with it, though the screen is certainly fine on the eyes and I appreciate being able to change the font size and margins. I hope I'll soon become more comfortable with it.

 Originally Posted By: Georgina
Earlier today, for some reason not known to me, I began wondering about the impact of e-readers on the second-hand book market, lending books to friends, and libraries. All of these usual activities aren't an option with an e-reader. I'm not certain I'm keen on that, either.


I have noticed that my local library's catalog has a few listings here or there for electronic versions of books. I haven't looked into how that works in terms of borrowing, downloading, etc., and presumably how one can make use of them with a portable device depends on the format they are in and what format one's device reads. I also saw an ad recently for the Nook that suggested that it allows one to share an e-book with one other person (who also has a Nook, presumably).

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#90815 - 04/12/11 12:31 PM Re: Electronic Reading Devices [Re: CaitlinM2]
LaSalleUGirl
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/25/01
Posts: 1895
Loc: Philadelphia, PA, USA

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So, I got a Kindle about a month ago. Ultimately, I was convinced by viva and GingerCat's arguments about using it for travel. (Um, and also using it for reading books I'm slightly ashamed to be reading... like Flowers in the Attic or the House of Night books. But that wasn't my primary reason for getting it.)

Anyway, I took my Kindle with me to a conference last week, and it was a revelation. For the first time in my entire life, I didn't have to pack a separate bag of books to take on the plane. I had a Kindle full of reading material and the option of sucking something new out of thin air if I decided I didn't feel like reading what I already had. Mindboggling. I've now read three full-length books on the Kindle, plus a few shorter things. Someone said upthread that s/he felt like s/he wasn't parsing the text as effectively as s/he does with a physical book, and I'd have to agree. But the experience of reading on the screen wasn't as bothersome as I had expected.

I'm still struggling with the idea that I can't share what I've read. Under ordinary circumstances, I'd be trying to press my copy of Faithful Place into the hands of anyone who seemed even remotely interested. It bugs me that I can't do that with the Kindle copy I just finished.

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#90816 - 04/12/11 12:45 PM Re: Electronic Reading Devices [Re: LaSalleUGirl]
Erin W
Ching Shih


Registered: 11/02/06
Posts: 362
Loc: Ohio

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The Kindle has or will soon have a share/lend function now. I know this because I have been researching e-readers to buy one for my mom when she retires at the end of this month. The way it works (I think) is you 'send' the book to the friend you want to lend it to and they get access to it for 2 weeks or whatever. The Nook has a similar function, as Caitlin M2 noted above.

Drawback: anyone you want to lend a book to has to have the same e-reader that you have.


Edited by Erin W (04/12/11 12:46 PM)
Edit Reason: additional info

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#90818 - 04/13/11 04:57 PM Re: Electronic Reading Devices [Re: LaSalleUGirl]
viva
Ching Shih


Registered: 09/06/03
Posts: 958
Loc: Houston TX

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LSUG - ha! I have all of the Flowers in the Attic series on my Kindle. Quickly tucked away in a collection after reading so they wouldn't be so obvious. Another little ancillary benefit.
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#90823 - 04/17/11 10:56 PM Re: Electronic Reading Devices [Re: viva]
CaitlinM2



Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 457
Loc: San Francisco Bay Area

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Heh, I hadn't thought about the potential for disguising shameful reading via Kindle. I'll have to remember that. A year later, I'm still not buying many books, so am not using my Kindle much - though I have bought a couple on Kindle and also read some free/cheap ones on it. I'm also stuck on buying in paper books I want to own because I love the author or book, because I like books as physical objects, want to be able to lend them, and also because e-books seem less permanent to me (despite the fact that Amazon keeps Kindle purchases for you and they're not married to the device). The Kindle will definitely accompany me traveling, though.

On the cost front, I preordered Faithful Place in hardback from Amazon, and by the time it shipped, the price was down to around a dollar more than the Kindle price (I see it's gone up again), making the cost a wash. Portability goes to Kindle, of course, and lendability to the paper version (and I have lent it).

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#91037 - 08/23/11 01:14 PM Re: Electronic Reading Devices [Re: CaitlinM2]
VegetarianOnHiatus
Ching Shih


Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 1089
Loc: Somerville, MA, USA

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I've read a couple books so far on my iPhone, via an app called Kobo. It's super handy having it on the subway, especially when I've already got it out to listen to music as I walked to the subway. However, I'm having a hard time with it - I can't figure out how to download new books. I know I've done it, but now I can't figure it out. Does anyone else have on of these?
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#91040 - 08/26/11 10:40 AM Re: Electronic Reading Devices [Re: VegetarianOnHiatus]
VegetarianOnHiatus
Ching Shih


Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 1089
Loc: Somerville, MA, USA

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I guess I can't modify my post, so sorry for the double post. I figured out that they've changed the Kobo app so you can't download books from it. I went to their Web site and did it that way. Yay! But it doesn't look like they have Wharton for free anymore, which is a bummer. I did get all of Austen, since I just started rereading Pride & Prejudice (after just having watched the tasty Colin Firth adaptation this week).
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